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Plant- and marine-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have differential effects on fasting and postprandial blood lipid concentrations and on the susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification in moderately hyperlipidemic subjects.
Am J Clin Nutr 2003; 77(4):783-95AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) can be converted to long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in humans and may reproduce some of the beneficial effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on cardiovascular disease risk factors.

OBJECTIVE

This study aimed to compare the effects of increased dietary intakes of ALA and EPA+DHA on a range of atherogenic risk factors.

DESIGN

This was a placebo-controlled, parallel study involving 150 moderately hyperlipidemic subjects randomly assigned to 1 of 5 interventions: 0.8 or 1.7 g EPA+DHA/d, 4.5 or 9.5 g ALA/d, or an n-6 PUFA control for 6 mo. Fatty acids were incorporated into 25 g of fat spread and 3 capsules to be consumed daily.

RESULTS

The change in fasting or postprandial lipid, glucose, or insulin concentrations or in blood pressure was not significantly different after any of the n-3 PUFA interventions compared with the n-6 PUFA control. The mean (+/- SEM) change in fasting triacylglycerols after the 1.7-g/d EPA+DHA intervention (-7.7 +/- 4.99%) was significantly (P < 0.05) different from the change after the 9.5-g/d ALA intervention (10.9 +/- 4.5%). The ex vivo susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was higher after the 1.7-g/d EPA+DHA intervention than after the control and ALA interventions (P < 0.05). There was no significant change in plasma alpha-tocopherol concentrations or in whole plasma antioxidant status in any of the groups.

CONCLUSION

At estimated biologically equivalent intakes, dietary ALA and EPA+DHA have different physiologic effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition, School of Food Biosciences, University of Reading, Reading, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12663273

Citation

Finnegan, Yvonne E., et al. "Plant- and Marine-derived N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Have Differential Effects On Fasting and Postprandial Blood Lipid Concentrations and On the Susceptibility of LDL to Oxidative Modification in Moderately Hyperlipidemic Subjects." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 77, no. 4, 2003, pp. 783-95.
Finnegan YE, Minihane AM, Leigh-Firbank EC, et al. Plant- and marine-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have differential effects on fasting and postprandial blood lipid concentrations and on the susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification in moderately hyperlipidemic subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;77(4):783-95.
Finnegan, Y. E., Minihane, A. M., Leigh-Firbank, E. C., Kew, S., Meijer, G. W., Muggli, R., ... Williams, C. M. (2003). Plant- and marine-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have differential effects on fasting and postprandial blood lipid concentrations and on the susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification in moderately hyperlipidemic subjects. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 77(4), pp. 783-95.
Finnegan YE, et al. Plant- and Marine-derived N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Have Differential Effects On Fasting and Postprandial Blood Lipid Concentrations and On the Susceptibility of LDL to Oxidative Modification in Moderately Hyperlipidemic Subjects. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;77(4):783-95. PubMed PMID: 12663273.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plant- and marine-derived n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have differential effects on fasting and postprandial blood lipid concentrations and on the susceptibility of LDL to oxidative modification in moderately hyperlipidemic subjects. AU - Finnegan,Yvonne E, AU - Minihane,Anne M, AU - Leigh-Firbank,Elizabeth C, AU - Kew,Samantha, AU - Meijer,Gert W, AU - Muggli,Reto, AU - Calder,Philip C, AU - Williams,Christine M, PY - 2003/3/29/pubmed PY - 2003/4/25/medline PY - 2003/3/29/entrez SP - 783 EP - 95 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 77 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) can be converted to long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in humans and may reproduce some of the beneficial effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on cardiovascular disease risk factors. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the effects of increased dietary intakes of ALA and EPA+DHA on a range of atherogenic risk factors. DESIGN: This was a placebo-controlled, parallel study involving 150 moderately hyperlipidemic subjects randomly assigned to 1 of 5 interventions: 0.8 or 1.7 g EPA+DHA/d, 4.5 or 9.5 g ALA/d, or an n-6 PUFA control for 6 mo. Fatty acids were incorporated into 25 g of fat spread and 3 capsules to be consumed daily. RESULTS: The change in fasting or postprandial lipid, glucose, or insulin concentrations or in blood pressure was not significantly different after any of the n-3 PUFA interventions compared with the n-6 PUFA control. The mean (+/- SEM) change in fasting triacylglycerols after the 1.7-g/d EPA+DHA intervention (-7.7 +/- 4.99%) was significantly (P < 0.05) different from the change after the 9.5-g/d ALA intervention (10.9 +/- 4.5%). The ex vivo susceptibility of LDL to oxidation was higher after the 1.7-g/d EPA+DHA intervention than after the control and ALA interventions (P < 0.05). There was no significant change in plasma alpha-tocopherol concentrations or in whole plasma antioxidant status in any of the groups. CONCLUSION: At estimated biologically equivalent intakes, dietary ALA and EPA+DHA have different physiologic effects. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12663273/Plant__and_marine_derived_n_3_polyunsaturated_fatty_acids_have_differential_effects_on_fasting_and_postprandial_blood_lipid_concentrations_and_on_the_susceptibility_of_LDL_to_oxidative_modification_in_moderately_hyperlipidemic_subjects_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/77.4.783 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -