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Effect of a calcium and exercise intervention on the bone mineral status of 16-18-y-old adolescent girls.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Apr; 77(4):985-92.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Osteoporosis may be prevented or delayed by maximizing peak bone mass through diet modification and physical activity during adolescence.

OBJECTIVE

We studied whether increases in calcium intake and physical activity effectively increase the bone mineral status of adolescent girls aged 16-18 y.

DESIGN

We conducted a 15.5-mo study of calcium supplementation (1000 mg Ca/d as carbonate) in 144 adolescent girls aged 17.3 +/- 0.3 y (+/- SD). The subjects were randomly allocated to an exercise (three 45-min exercise-to-music classes/wk during term time) or nonexercise group. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of the whole body, spine, forearm, and hip was performed before and after intervention.

RESULTS

The mean (+/- SD) percentage of subjects compliant with supplement taking was 70 +/- 27% and with exercise class attendance was 36 +/- 25%. Baseline calcium intake was 938 +/- 411 mg/d. Calcium supplementation significantly increased size-adjusted bone mineral content. The effect was stronger in subjects with good compliance (percentage difference +/- SE): whole body, 0.8 +/- 0.3% (P < or = 0.01); lumbar spine, 1.9 +/- 0.5% (P < or = 0.001); ultradistal radius, 1.3 +/- 0.6% (P < or = 0.05); total hip, 2.7 +/- 0.6% (P < or = 0.001); femoral neck, 2.2 +/- 0.7% (P < or = 0.001); trochanter, 4.8 +/- 0.9% (P < or = 0.001). Attendance at > 50% of the exercise sessions was significant at the total hip (1.4 +/- 0.7%; P < or = 0.05) and trochanter (2.6 +/- 1.2%; P < or = 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Calcium supplementation and exercise enhanced bone mineral status in adolescent girls. Whether this is a lasting benefit, leading to the optimization of peak bone mass and a reduction in fracture risk, needs to be determined.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MRC Human Nutrition Research, Cambridge, United Kingdom.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12663301

Citation

Stear, Samantha J., et al. "Effect of a Calcium and Exercise Intervention On the Bone Mineral Status of 16-18-y-old Adolescent Girls." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 77, no. 4, 2003, pp. 985-92.
Stear SJ, Prentice A, Jones SC, et al. Effect of a calcium and exercise intervention on the bone mineral status of 16-18-y-old adolescent girls. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;77(4):985-92.
Stear, S. J., Prentice, A., Jones, S. C., & Cole, T. J. (2003). Effect of a calcium and exercise intervention on the bone mineral status of 16-18-y-old adolescent girls. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 77(4), 985-92.
Stear SJ, et al. Effect of a Calcium and Exercise Intervention On the Bone Mineral Status of 16-18-y-old Adolescent Girls. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;77(4):985-92. PubMed PMID: 12663301.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of a calcium and exercise intervention on the bone mineral status of 16-18-y-old adolescent girls. AU - Stear,Samantha J, AU - Prentice,Ann, AU - Jones,Sarah C, AU - Cole,Tim J, PY - 2003/3/29/pubmed PY - 2003/4/25/medline PY - 2003/3/29/entrez SP - 985 EP - 92 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 77 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Osteoporosis may be prevented or delayed by maximizing peak bone mass through diet modification and physical activity during adolescence. OBJECTIVE: We studied whether increases in calcium intake and physical activity effectively increase the bone mineral status of adolescent girls aged 16-18 y. DESIGN: We conducted a 15.5-mo study of calcium supplementation (1000 mg Ca/d as carbonate) in 144 adolescent girls aged 17.3 +/- 0.3 y (+/- SD). The subjects were randomly allocated to an exercise (three 45-min exercise-to-music classes/wk during term time) or nonexercise group. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of the whole body, spine, forearm, and hip was performed before and after intervention. RESULTS: The mean (+/- SD) percentage of subjects compliant with supplement taking was 70 +/- 27% and with exercise class attendance was 36 +/- 25%. Baseline calcium intake was 938 +/- 411 mg/d. Calcium supplementation significantly increased size-adjusted bone mineral content. The effect was stronger in subjects with good compliance (percentage difference +/- SE): whole body, 0.8 +/- 0.3% (P < or = 0.01); lumbar spine, 1.9 +/- 0.5% (P < or = 0.001); ultradistal radius, 1.3 +/- 0.6% (P < or = 0.05); total hip, 2.7 +/- 0.6% (P < or = 0.001); femoral neck, 2.2 +/- 0.7% (P < or = 0.001); trochanter, 4.8 +/- 0.9% (P < or = 0.001). Attendance at > 50% of the exercise sessions was significant at the total hip (1.4 +/- 0.7%; P < or = 0.05) and trochanter (2.6 +/- 1.2%; P < or = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Calcium supplementation and exercise enhanced bone mineral status in adolescent girls. Whether this is a lasting benefit, leading to the optimization of peak bone mass and a reduction in fracture risk, needs to be determined. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12663301/Effect_of_a_calcium_and_exercise_intervention_on_the_bone_mineral_status_of_16_18_y_old_adolescent_girls_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/77.4.985 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -