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Olfactory functioning in Gulf War-era veterans: relationships to war-zone duty, self-reported hazards exposures, and psychological distress.
J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2003 Mar; 9(3):407-18.JI

Abstract

To explore possible neurotoxic sequelae of Gulf War (GW) participation, olfactory identification performance, neurocognitive functioning, health perceptions, and emotional distress were assessed in 72 veterans deployed to the GW and 33 military personnel activated during the GW but not deployed to the war zone. Findings revealed that war-zone-exposed veterans reported more concerns about health, cognitive functioning, and depression than did their counterparts who did not see war-zone duty. There was no evidence that performances on olfactory or neurocognitive measures were related to war-zone duty or to self-reported exposure to GW toxicants. However, symptoms of emotional distress were positively correlated with self-report of health and cognitive complaints. Results do not provide support for the hypothesis that objectively-measured sensory (i.e., olfactory) or cognitive deficits are related to war-zone participation but do underscore the increasingly demonstrated association between self-reported health concerns and symptoms of emotional distress.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Mental Health Service Line, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112, USA. jennifer.vasterling@med.va.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12666765

Citation

Vasterling, Jennifer J., et al. "Olfactory Functioning in Gulf War-era Veterans: Relationships to War-zone Duty, Self-reported Hazards Exposures, and Psychological Distress." Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS, vol. 9, no. 3, 2003, pp. 407-18.
Vasterling JJ, Brailey K, Tomlin H, et al. Olfactory functioning in Gulf War-era veterans: relationships to war-zone duty, self-reported hazards exposures, and psychological distress. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2003;9(3):407-18.
Vasterling, J. J., Brailey, K., Tomlin, H., Rice, J., & Sutker, P. B. (2003). Olfactory functioning in Gulf War-era veterans: relationships to war-zone duty, self-reported hazards exposures, and psychological distress. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS, 9(3), 407-18.
Vasterling JJ, et al. Olfactory Functioning in Gulf War-era Veterans: Relationships to War-zone Duty, Self-reported Hazards Exposures, and Psychological Distress. J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2003;9(3):407-18. PubMed PMID: 12666765.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Olfactory functioning in Gulf War-era veterans: relationships to war-zone duty, self-reported hazards exposures, and psychological distress. AU - Vasterling,Jennifer J, AU - Brailey,Kevin, AU - Tomlin,Holly, AU - Rice,Janet, AU - Sutker,Patricia B, PY - 2002/05/13/revised PY - 2003/4/2/pubmed PY - 2003/4/30/medline PY - 2003/4/2/entrez SP - 407 EP - 18 JF - Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS JO - J Int Neuropsychol Soc VL - 9 IS - 3 N2 - To explore possible neurotoxic sequelae of Gulf War (GW) participation, olfactory identification performance, neurocognitive functioning, health perceptions, and emotional distress were assessed in 72 veterans deployed to the GW and 33 military personnel activated during the GW but not deployed to the war zone. Findings revealed that war-zone-exposed veterans reported more concerns about health, cognitive functioning, and depression than did their counterparts who did not see war-zone duty. There was no evidence that performances on olfactory or neurocognitive measures were related to war-zone duty or to self-reported exposure to GW toxicants. However, symptoms of emotional distress were positively correlated with self-report of health and cognitive complaints. Results do not provide support for the hypothesis that objectively-measured sensory (i.e., olfactory) or cognitive deficits are related to war-zone participation but do underscore the increasingly demonstrated association between self-reported health concerns and symptoms of emotional distress. SN - 1355-6177 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12666765/Olfactory_functioning_in_Gulf_War_era_veterans:_relationships_to_war_zone_duty_self_reported_hazards_exposures_and_psychological_distress_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1355617703930062/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -