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Catatonia in childhood and adolescence.
Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2003 Apr; 57(2):129-37.PC

Abstract

Child and adolescent catatonia has been poorly investigated. A literature review was undertaken to clarify phenomenology, diagnosis, etiology, and treatment as well as ethical problems of catatonia in childhood and adolescence. Although there are no accepted standardized criteria for catatonia in childhood and adolescence, catatonic features described by child psychiatrists are similar to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edn; DSM-IV) criteria for catatonia. With respect to etiology, the motor and behavioral symptoms that are part of catatonia bear some similarities with those seen in autism. Several case reports suggest an association between catatonia and general medical conditions. Certain drugs abused by youngsters as well as prescribed medicine can induce catatonia. Regarding catatonic cases originally diagnosed as schizophrenia, it is unclear whether all of these cases should be identified as schizophrenia or whether some of them are pervasive developmental disorders that develop psychic features in adolescence. Environmental changes preceding the onset of catatonia in patients with mood disorder play a possibly important role. Examples that suggest stress-induced catatonia, although rare, also exist. A few patients exhibit features of malignant catatonia, some without taking neuroleptics and others having taken them. Benzodiazepines and electroconvulsive therapy are considered to be effective treatments for catatonic youngsters.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychopathology, Faculty of Medicine, Gifu University, Japan. takaoka@cc.gifu-u.ac.jpNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12667158

Citation

Takaoka, Ken, and Tomoji Takata. "Catatonia in Childhood and Adolescence." Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, vol. 57, no. 2, 2003, pp. 129-37.
Takaoka K, Takata T. Catatonia in childhood and adolescence. Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2003;57(2):129-37.
Takaoka, K., & Takata, T. (2003). Catatonia in childhood and adolescence. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, 57(2), 129-37.
Takaoka K, Takata T. Catatonia in Childhood and Adolescence. Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2003;57(2):129-37. PubMed PMID: 12667158.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Catatonia in childhood and adolescence. AU - Takaoka,Ken, AU - Takata,Tomoji, PY - 2003/4/2/pubmed PY - 2003/7/29/medline PY - 2003/4/2/entrez SP - 129 EP - 37 JF - Psychiatry and clinical neurosciences JO - Psychiatry Clin Neurosci VL - 57 IS - 2 N2 - Child and adolescent catatonia has been poorly investigated. A literature review was undertaken to clarify phenomenology, diagnosis, etiology, and treatment as well as ethical problems of catatonia in childhood and adolescence. Although there are no accepted standardized criteria for catatonia in childhood and adolescence, catatonic features described by child psychiatrists are similar to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edn; DSM-IV) criteria for catatonia. With respect to etiology, the motor and behavioral symptoms that are part of catatonia bear some similarities with those seen in autism. Several case reports suggest an association between catatonia and general medical conditions. Certain drugs abused by youngsters as well as prescribed medicine can induce catatonia. Regarding catatonic cases originally diagnosed as schizophrenia, it is unclear whether all of these cases should be identified as schizophrenia or whether some of them are pervasive developmental disorders that develop psychic features in adolescence. Environmental changes preceding the onset of catatonia in patients with mood disorder play a possibly important role. Examples that suggest stress-induced catatonia, although rare, also exist. A few patients exhibit features of malignant catatonia, some without taking neuroleptics and others having taken them. Benzodiazepines and electroconvulsive therapy are considered to be effective treatments for catatonic youngsters. SN - 1323-1316 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12667158/Catatonia_in_childhood_and_adolescence_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1323-1316&date=2003&volume=57&issue=2&spage=129 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -