Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Bacterial susceptibility to and chemical composition of essential oils from Thymus kotschyanus and Thymus persicus.
J Agric Food Chem. 2003 Apr 09; 51(8):2200-5.JA

Abstract

Susceptibility of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Pseudomonas aeroginosa to the essential oils extracted from two varieties of Thyme, i.e., Thymus kotschyanus Boiss. and Hohen. and Thymus persicus L. at preflowering and flowering stages were studied. The disk diffusion method was used to evaluate the zone of microbial growth inhibition at various concentrations of the oils. Minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration of the oils were determined and compared with each other. The oils from the above plants were found to be strongly bactericidal with that of T. kotschyanus being more effective. T. kotschyanusand T. persicus oils analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry (MS) lead to identification of 33 and 26 components, respectively. The profile of the oil components from T. persicuswas similar to that of T. kotschyanus in almost all of the compounds but at different concentrations. The major components of T. kotschyanus oil before and at the flowering stages were carvacrol (35.06, 22.75%), thymol (26.60, 16.52%), gamma-terpinene (7.81, 0.34%), gamma-terpinene (4.34, 0%), borneol (2.29, 4.52%), myrcene (0.26, 12.65%), thymolquinone (0, 11.39%), nerol (0, 6.10%), and beta-caryophyllene (0, 5.54%), respectively, and those of T. persicus at the same stages were carvacrol (38.96, 27.07%), thymol (6.48, 11.86%), P-cymene (7.51, 10.16%), gamma-terpineol (0, 9.51%), nerol (15.66, 9.41%), gamma-terpinene (6.11, 6.51%), and thymol acetate (5.29, 5.30%), respectively. The contribution of oil components to its antibacterial property is discussed. High aromatic compound content of the phenol-rich oils seems to account for strong antibacterial activity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, College of Basic Sciences, Shahed University, Vali Asr-Taleqani Cross, Tehran-15987, I.R. Iran. irasooli@yahoo.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12670156

Citation

Rasooli, Iraj, and Seyed Akbar Mirmostafa. "Bacterial Susceptibility to and Chemical Composition of Essential Oils From Thymus Kotschyanus and Thymus Persicus." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 51, no. 8, 2003, pp. 2200-5.
Rasooli I, Mirmostafa SA. Bacterial susceptibility to and chemical composition of essential oils from Thymus kotschyanus and Thymus persicus. J Agric Food Chem. 2003;51(8):2200-5.
Rasooli, I., & Mirmostafa, S. A. (2003). Bacterial susceptibility to and chemical composition of essential oils from Thymus kotschyanus and Thymus persicus. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 51(8), 2200-5.
Rasooli I, Mirmostafa SA. Bacterial Susceptibility to and Chemical Composition of Essential Oils From Thymus Kotschyanus and Thymus Persicus. J Agric Food Chem. 2003 Apr 9;51(8):2200-5. PubMed PMID: 12670156.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bacterial susceptibility to and chemical composition of essential oils from Thymus kotschyanus and Thymus persicus. AU - Rasooli,Iraj, AU - Mirmostafa,Seyed Akbar, PY - 2003/4/3/pubmed PY - 2003/5/3/medline PY - 2003/4/3/entrez SP - 2200 EP - 5 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 51 IS - 8 N2 - Susceptibility of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Pseudomonas aeroginosa to the essential oils extracted from two varieties of Thyme, i.e., Thymus kotschyanus Boiss. and Hohen. and Thymus persicus L. at preflowering and flowering stages were studied. The disk diffusion method was used to evaluate the zone of microbial growth inhibition at various concentrations of the oils. Minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration of the oils were determined and compared with each other. The oils from the above plants were found to be strongly bactericidal with that of T. kotschyanus being more effective. T. kotschyanusand T. persicus oils analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC/mass spectrometry (MS) lead to identification of 33 and 26 components, respectively. The profile of the oil components from T. persicuswas similar to that of T. kotschyanus in almost all of the compounds but at different concentrations. The major components of T. kotschyanus oil before and at the flowering stages were carvacrol (35.06, 22.75%), thymol (26.60, 16.52%), gamma-terpinene (7.81, 0.34%), gamma-terpinene (4.34, 0%), borneol (2.29, 4.52%), myrcene (0.26, 12.65%), thymolquinone (0, 11.39%), nerol (0, 6.10%), and beta-caryophyllene (0, 5.54%), respectively, and those of T. persicus at the same stages were carvacrol (38.96, 27.07%), thymol (6.48, 11.86%), P-cymene (7.51, 10.16%), gamma-terpineol (0, 9.51%), nerol (15.66, 9.41%), gamma-terpinene (6.11, 6.51%), and thymol acetate (5.29, 5.30%), respectively. The contribution of oil components to its antibacterial property is discussed. High aromatic compound content of the phenol-rich oils seems to account for strong antibacterial activity. SN - 0021-8561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12670156/Bacterial_susceptibility_to_and_chemical_composition_of_essential_oils_from_Thymus_kotschyanus_and_Thymus_persicus_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf0261755 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -