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The trend of imported mycoses in Japan.
J Infect Chemother. 2003 Mar; 9(1):16-20.JI

Abstract

Pathogenic fungi that are non-native in Japan are highly virulent and present a significant health hazard to persons in the environment into which they are introduced. Little is known, however, about the precise trend of infection by imported mycoses in Japan. To clarify this issue, all available cases were collected through a search of MEDLINE and Japana Centra Revuo Medicine and analyzed. Also included in this analysis were cases not reported in the literature for which the authors provided identification of the fungi, diagnosis, or treatment. The analysis revealed that, for three diseases, the number of imported mycoses cases in Japan is much higher than previously reported: 31 cases of coccidioidomycosis, 34 cases of histoplasmosis, and 17 cases of paracoccidioidomycosis. Additionally, one case of penicilliosis marneffei was found. The most rapid increase in the incidence of these mycoses occurred from 1991 to 1995. Analysis of the patients' profiles provided the following information: (1) coccidioidomycosis infection in Japan is increasing very rapidly, (2) Japan might be an endemic area of histoplasmosis infection, (3) histoplasmosis is a potentially fatal disease; and (4) reliable serodiagnostic methods have been used only infrequently. Because of the increase of international travel and immigration, the incidence of imported mycoses in Japan is expected to continue rising, and mycoses that have never been reported in Japan, such as blastomycosis, might also be encountered in the near future. To cope with this newly emerging health problem to residents of Japan, the Japanese medical system must train its members to identify and treat mycoses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Center for Pathogenic Fungi and Microbial Toxicoses, Chiba University, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8673, Japan. kkamei@myco.pf.chiba-u.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12673401

Citation

Kamei, Katsuhiko, et al. "The Trend of Imported Mycoses in Japan." Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy : Official Journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy, vol. 9, no. 1, 2003, pp. 16-20.
Kamei K, Sano A, Kikuchi K, et al. The trend of imported mycoses in Japan. J Infect Chemother. 2003;9(1):16-20.
Kamei, K., Sano, A., Kikuchi, K., Makimura, K., Niimi, M., Suzuki, K., Uehara, Y., Okabe, N., Nishimura, K., & Miyaji, M. (2003). The trend of imported mycoses in Japan. Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy : Official Journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy, 9(1), 16-20.
Kamei K, et al. The Trend of Imported Mycoses in Japan. J Infect Chemother. 2003;9(1):16-20. PubMed PMID: 12673401.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The trend of imported mycoses in Japan. AU - Kamei,Katsuhiko, AU - Sano,Ayako, AU - Kikuchi,Ken, AU - Makimura,Koichi, AU - Niimi,Masakazu, AU - Suzuki,Kazuo, AU - Uehara,Yoshimasa, AU - Okabe,Nobuhiko, AU - Nishimura,Kazuko, AU - Miyaji,Makoto, PY - 2003/4/4/pubmed PY - 2003/6/14/medline PY - 2003/4/4/entrez SP - 16 EP - 20 JF - Journal of infection and chemotherapy : official journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy JO - J. Infect. Chemother. VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - Pathogenic fungi that are non-native in Japan are highly virulent and present a significant health hazard to persons in the environment into which they are introduced. Little is known, however, about the precise trend of infection by imported mycoses in Japan. To clarify this issue, all available cases were collected through a search of MEDLINE and Japana Centra Revuo Medicine and analyzed. Also included in this analysis were cases not reported in the literature for which the authors provided identification of the fungi, diagnosis, or treatment. The analysis revealed that, for three diseases, the number of imported mycoses cases in Japan is much higher than previously reported: 31 cases of coccidioidomycosis, 34 cases of histoplasmosis, and 17 cases of paracoccidioidomycosis. Additionally, one case of penicilliosis marneffei was found. The most rapid increase in the incidence of these mycoses occurred from 1991 to 1995. Analysis of the patients' profiles provided the following information: (1) coccidioidomycosis infection in Japan is increasing very rapidly, (2) Japan might be an endemic area of histoplasmosis infection, (3) histoplasmosis is a potentially fatal disease; and (4) reliable serodiagnostic methods have been used only infrequently. Because of the increase of international travel and immigration, the incidence of imported mycoses in Japan is expected to continue rising, and mycoses that have never been reported in Japan, such as blastomycosis, might also be encountered in the near future. To cope with this newly emerging health problem to residents of Japan, the Japanese medical system must train its members to identify and treat mycoses. SN - 1341-321X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12673401/The_trend_of_imported_mycoses_in_Japan_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1341-321X(04)71159-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -