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Sex differences in infant-mother attachment.
Psychol Rep. 2003 Feb; 92(1):84-8.PR

Abstract

A sex difference in security of infant attachment was found in a sample of 52 infant-mother dyads. The infants were enrolled in early care and education programs within a predominantly small-town geographic area in the southwest. Security of attachment was assessed using the Strange Situation procedure. Male infants (76%) were significantly more likely to be securely attached than female infants (39%). No other variables related to the infants' early care and education experience or mothers' age, race, marital status, and education were significantly associated with infants' attachment status.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos 78666-4616, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12674262

Citation

Williams, Sue W., and Elizabeth M. Blunk. "Sex Differences in Infant-mother Attachment." Psychological Reports, vol. 92, no. 1, 2003, pp. 84-8.
Williams SW, Blunk EM. Sex differences in infant-mother attachment. Psychol Rep. 2003;92(1):84-8.
Williams, S. W., & Blunk, E. M. (2003). Sex differences in infant-mother attachment. Psychological Reports, 92(1), 84-8.
Williams SW, Blunk EM. Sex Differences in Infant-mother Attachment. Psychol Rep. 2003;92(1):84-8. PubMed PMID: 12674262.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sex differences in infant-mother attachment. AU - Williams,Sue W, AU - Blunk,Elizabeth M, PY - 2003/4/4/pubmed PY - 2003/4/26/medline PY - 2003/4/4/entrez SP - 84 EP - 8 JF - Psychological reports JO - Psychol Rep VL - 92 IS - 1 N2 - A sex difference in security of infant attachment was found in a sample of 52 infant-mother dyads. The infants were enrolled in early care and education programs within a predominantly small-town geographic area in the southwest. Security of attachment was assessed using the Strange Situation procedure. Male infants (76%) were significantly more likely to be securely attached than female infants (39%). No other variables related to the infants' early care and education experience or mothers' age, race, marital status, and education were significantly associated with infants' attachment status. SN - 0033-2941 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12674262/Sex_differences_in_infant_mother_attachment_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.2466/pr0.2003.92.1.84?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -