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Grasp effects of the Ebbinghaus illusion: obstacle avoidance is not the explanation.
Exp Brain Res. 2003 Apr; 149(4):470-7.EB

Abstract

The perception-versus-action hypothesis states that visual information is processed in two different streams, one for visual awareness (or perception) and one for motor performance. Previous reports that the Ebbinghaus illusion deceives perception but not grasping seemed to indicate that this dichotomy between perception and action was fundamental enough to be reflected in the overt behavior of non-neurological, healthy humans. Contrary to this view we show that the Ebbinghaus illusion affects grasping to the same extent as perception. We also show that the grasp effects cannot be accounted for by non-perceptual obstacle avoidance mechanisms as has recently been suggested. Instead, even subtle variations of the Ebbinghaus illusion affect grasping in the same way as they affect perception. Our results suggest that the same signals are responsible for the perceptual effects and for the motor effects of the Ebbinghaus illusion. This casts doubt on one line of evidence, which used to strongly favor the perception-versus-action hypothesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Max Planck Institut für Biologische Kybernetik, Spemannstr 38, 72076 Tübingen, Germany. volker.franz@tuebingen.mpg.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12677327

Citation

Franz, V H., et al. "Grasp Effects of the Ebbinghaus Illusion: Obstacle Avoidance Is Not the Explanation." Experimental Brain Research, vol. 149, no. 4, 2003, pp. 470-7.
Franz VH, Bülthoff HH, Fahle M. Grasp effects of the Ebbinghaus illusion: obstacle avoidance is not the explanation. Exp Brain Res. 2003;149(4):470-7.
Franz, V. H., Bülthoff, H. H., & Fahle, M. (2003). Grasp effects of the Ebbinghaus illusion: obstacle avoidance is not the explanation. Experimental Brain Research, 149(4), 470-7.
Franz VH, Bülthoff HH, Fahle M. Grasp Effects of the Ebbinghaus Illusion: Obstacle Avoidance Is Not the Explanation. Exp Brain Res. 2003;149(4):470-7. PubMed PMID: 12677327.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Grasp effects of the Ebbinghaus illusion: obstacle avoidance is not the explanation. AU - Franz,V H, AU - Bülthoff,H H, AU - Fahle,M, Y1 - 2003/02/19/ PY - 2002/07/08/received PY - 2002/11/28/accepted PY - 2003/4/5/pubmed PY - 2003/7/8/medline PY - 2003/4/5/entrez SP - 470 EP - 7 JF - Experimental brain research JO - Exp Brain Res VL - 149 IS - 4 N2 - The perception-versus-action hypothesis states that visual information is processed in two different streams, one for visual awareness (or perception) and one for motor performance. Previous reports that the Ebbinghaus illusion deceives perception but not grasping seemed to indicate that this dichotomy between perception and action was fundamental enough to be reflected in the overt behavior of non-neurological, healthy humans. Contrary to this view we show that the Ebbinghaus illusion affects grasping to the same extent as perception. We also show that the grasp effects cannot be accounted for by non-perceptual obstacle avoidance mechanisms as has recently been suggested. Instead, even subtle variations of the Ebbinghaus illusion affect grasping in the same way as they affect perception. Our results suggest that the same signals are responsible for the perceptual effects and for the motor effects of the Ebbinghaus illusion. This casts doubt on one line of evidence, which used to strongly favor the perception-versus-action hypothesis. SN - 0014-4819 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12677327/Grasp_effects_of_the_Ebbinghaus_illusion:_obstacle_avoidance_is_not_the_explanation_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-002-1364-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -