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Prevalence and mechanisms of hyperhomocysteinemia in elderly hospitalized patients.
J Nutr Health Aging. 2003; 7(2):111-6.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Plasma homocysteine concentrations increase with age and remain an independent risk factor for vascular disease in the elderly. There are negative correlations between plasma homocysteine and serum folate and vitamin B12 concentrations. Two mechanisms, poor nutritional status, and chronic atrophic gastritis, could explain hyperhomocysteinemia.

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of the study was to determine prevalence and mechanisms of hyperhomocysteinemia in older hospitalized patients.

DESIGNS

During a 12-month period, all the consecutive hospitalized patients who underwent gastric endoscopy were recruited in this observational prospective study. Clinical, histological, and biological data concerning nutritional status, gastric analysis, homocysteine, vitamin B12, and folate concentrations were collected during the study for each included patient.

RESULTS

One hundred and ninety six patients (132 women and 64 men, mean age: 85.3 5.7 years) were included. Hyperhomocysteinemia (>or= 18 mmol/l) was diagnosed in 45.4 %, cobalamin deficiency in 13.3 %, and folate deficiency in 11.7 % patients. Hyperhomocysteinemia was significantly correlated to cobalamin deficiency (r = - 0.21; p = 0.005). In a sub group of patients without hypothyroidism, or chronic renal impairment, univariate and multivariate analysis showed a significant association between hyper homocysteinemia and low MNA (OR: 0.92; 95% CI 0.85-0.99), and low albumin (OR: 0.92; 95% IC: 0.83-0.99; p = 0.04). No correlation was found between homocysteine concentrations and chronic atrophic gastritis or Helicobacter pylori infection.

CONCLUSION

Hyperhomocysteinemia seems to be frequent in the elderly and is associated with poor nutritional status rather than chronic atrophic gastritis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departement de Geriatrie, HOGER, Geneve, Suisse.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12679831

Citation

Salles-Montaudon, N, et al. "Prevalence and Mechanisms of Hyperhomocysteinemia in Elderly Hospitalized Patients." The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, vol. 7, no. 2, 2003, pp. 111-6.
Salles-Montaudon N, Parrot F, Balas D, et al. Prevalence and mechanisms of hyperhomocysteinemia in elderly hospitalized patients. J Nutr Health Aging. 2003;7(2):111-6.
Salles-Montaudon, N., Parrot, F., Balas, D., Bouzigon, E., Rainfray, M., & Emeriau, J. P. (2003). Prevalence and mechanisms of hyperhomocysteinemia in elderly hospitalized patients. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 7(2), 111-6.
Salles-Montaudon N, et al. Prevalence and Mechanisms of Hyperhomocysteinemia in Elderly Hospitalized Patients. J Nutr Health Aging. 2003;7(2):111-6. PubMed PMID: 12679831.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and mechanisms of hyperhomocysteinemia in elderly hospitalized patients. AU - Salles-Montaudon,N, AU - Parrot,F, AU - Balas,D, AU - Bouzigon,E, AU - Rainfray,M, AU - Emeriau,J-P, PY - 2003/4/8/pubmed PY - 2003/10/15/medline PY - 2003/4/8/entrez SP - 111 EP - 6 JF - The journal of nutrition, health & aging JO - J Nutr Health Aging VL - 7 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Plasma homocysteine concentrations increase with age and remain an independent risk factor for vascular disease in the elderly. There are negative correlations between plasma homocysteine and serum folate and vitamin B12 concentrations. Two mechanisms, poor nutritional status, and chronic atrophic gastritis, could explain hyperhomocysteinemia. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to determine prevalence and mechanisms of hyperhomocysteinemia in older hospitalized patients. DESIGNS: During a 12-month period, all the consecutive hospitalized patients who underwent gastric endoscopy were recruited in this observational prospective study. Clinical, histological, and biological data concerning nutritional status, gastric analysis, homocysteine, vitamin B12, and folate concentrations were collected during the study for each included patient. RESULTS: One hundred and ninety six patients (132 women and 64 men, mean age: 85.3 5.7 years) were included. Hyperhomocysteinemia (>or= 18 mmol/l) was diagnosed in 45.4 %, cobalamin deficiency in 13.3 %, and folate deficiency in 11.7 % patients. Hyperhomocysteinemia was significantly correlated to cobalamin deficiency (r = - 0.21; p = 0.005). In a sub group of patients without hypothyroidism, or chronic renal impairment, univariate and multivariate analysis showed a significant association between hyper homocysteinemia and low MNA (OR: 0.92; 95% CI 0.85-0.99), and low albumin (OR: 0.92; 95% IC: 0.83-0.99; p = 0.04). No correlation was found between homocysteine concentrations and chronic atrophic gastritis or Helicobacter pylori infection. CONCLUSION: Hyperhomocysteinemia seems to be frequent in the elderly and is associated with poor nutritional status rather than chronic atrophic gastritis. SN - 1279-7707 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12679831/Prevalence_and_mechanisms_of_hyperhomocysteinemia_in_elderly_hospitalized_patients_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/folicacid.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -