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Hepatitis A vaccination of infants: effect of maternal antibody status on antibody persistence and response to a booster dose.
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2003 Apr; 22(4):354-9.PI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Infants with passively transferred maternal antibody (PMA) to hepatitis A virus (HAV) have lower concentrations of antibody to HAV (anti-HAV) after vaccination. We examined the effect of PMA on persistence of anti-HAV and on immune memory.

METHODS

We measured anti-HAV concentrations of 6-year-old children who had responded to a three dose hepatitis A vaccine series at ages 2, 4 and 6 months. Group 1 children were born to anti-HAV-negative women; Group 2 children had anti-HAV-positive mothers and PMA at 2 months of age. Children without detectable antibody at 6-year follow-up were offered a booster dose [360 enzyme-linked immunosorbent units (ELU)]. An anamnestic response was defined as a postbooster anti-HAV concentration of > or =400 mIU/ml.

RESULTS

At follow-up, before the booster dose, Group 1 subjects had a higher geometric mean concentration (50 mIU/ml vs.18 mIU/ml, P = 0.007), and a larger proportion retained seroprotective concentrations of anti-HAV [21 of 31 (68%) vs.4 of 17 (24%)] compared with Group 2 subjects. The two stage antibody decline curves for the two groups from 8 months old to follow-up testing were parallel. An anamnestic response occurred in all (5 of 5) Group 1 and 67% (4 of 6) of Group 2 children. The geometric mean antibody concentrations after the booster were 1102 and 406 mIU/ml for Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.10).

CONCLUSIONS

Infants with PMA who receive hepatitis A vaccine have significantly lower concentrations of anti-HAV 6 years later than infants with no PMA who receive hepatitis A vaccine. Immune memory may remain functional despite these lower anti-HAV concentrations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Viral Hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Mailstop G37, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. afiore@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12690277

Citation

Fiore, Anthony E., et al. "Hepatitis a Vaccination of Infants: Effect of Maternal Antibody Status On Antibody Persistence and Response to a Booster Dose." The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 22, no. 4, 2003, pp. 354-9.
Fiore AE, Shapiro CN, Sabin K, et al. Hepatitis A vaccination of infants: effect of maternal antibody status on antibody persistence and response to a booster dose. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2003;22(4):354-9.
Fiore, A. E., Shapiro, C. N., Sabin, K., Labonte, K., Darling, K., Culver, D., Bell, B. P., & Margolis, H. S. (2003). Hepatitis A vaccination of infants: effect of maternal antibody status on antibody persistence and response to a booster dose. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 22(4), 354-9.
Fiore AE, et al. Hepatitis a Vaccination of Infants: Effect of Maternal Antibody Status On Antibody Persistence and Response to a Booster Dose. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2003;22(4):354-9. PubMed PMID: 12690277.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hepatitis A vaccination of infants: effect of maternal antibody status on antibody persistence and response to a booster dose. AU - Fiore,Anthony E, AU - Shapiro,Craig N, AU - Sabin,Keith, AU - Labonte,Kathy, AU - Darling,Karen, AU - Culver,David, AU - Bell,Beth P, AU - Margolis,Harold S, PY - 2003/4/12/pubmed PY - 2003/6/5/medline PY - 2003/4/12/entrez SP - 354 EP - 9 JF - The Pediatric infectious disease journal JO - Pediatr Infect Dis J VL - 22 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Infants with passively transferred maternal antibody (PMA) to hepatitis A virus (HAV) have lower concentrations of antibody to HAV (anti-HAV) after vaccination. We examined the effect of PMA on persistence of anti-HAV and on immune memory. METHODS: We measured anti-HAV concentrations of 6-year-old children who had responded to a three dose hepatitis A vaccine series at ages 2, 4 and 6 months. Group 1 children were born to anti-HAV-negative women; Group 2 children had anti-HAV-positive mothers and PMA at 2 months of age. Children without detectable antibody at 6-year follow-up were offered a booster dose [360 enzyme-linked immunosorbent units (ELU)]. An anamnestic response was defined as a postbooster anti-HAV concentration of > or =400 mIU/ml. RESULTS: At follow-up, before the booster dose, Group 1 subjects had a higher geometric mean concentration (50 mIU/ml vs.18 mIU/ml, P = 0.007), and a larger proportion retained seroprotective concentrations of anti-HAV [21 of 31 (68%) vs.4 of 17 (24%)] compared with Group 2 subjects. The two stage antibody decline curves for the two groups from 8 months old to follow-up testing were parallel. An anamnestic response occurred in all (5 of 5) Group 1 and 67% (4 of 6) of Group 2 children. The geometric mean antibody concentrations after the booster were 1102 and 406 mIU/ml for Groups 1 and 2, respectively (P = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS: Infants with PMA who receive hepatitis A vaccine have significantly lower concentrations of anti-HAV 6 years later than infants with no PMA who receive hepatitis A vaccine. Immune memory may remain functional despite these lower anti-HAV concentrations. SN - 0891-3668 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12690277/Hepatitis_A_vaccination_of_infants:_effect_of_maternal_antibody_status_on_antibody_persistence_and_response_to_a_booster_dose_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.inf.0000059446.52063.b9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -