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Treatment of epidemic and pandemic influenza with neuraminidase and M2 proton channel inhibitors.

Abstract

A small armentarium of anti-influenza drugs now exists, and includes the M2 blockers (amantadine and rimantadine) and the neuraminidase inhibitors (Relenza and Tamiflu). The neuraminidase inhibitors have certain advantages, including a broader spectrum of antiviral activity, including influenza A and B viruses. On the other hand, there is now much clinical experience with the M2 blockers, and these drugs are inexpensive. It is clear that influenza in different community groups needs to be managed in specific and targeted ways. For example, in the over-65-years and at-risk groups, vaccination will remain a mainstay of disease prevention. However, up to 40% of those in these groups may fail to receive vaccine, and therefore the antivirals can be used therapeutically, or, in defined circumstances, as prophylactics. At present, influenza is hardly managed in the community. The infrequent global outbreaks, pandemics, present further problems. The more extensive use of the two classes of antivirals, and also vaccines, in the important interpandemic years will provide a very significant investment in health benefits in the face of a new pandemic virus in an otherwise completely vulnerable population.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Academic and Retroscreen Virology, Barts and the London, Queen Mary's School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK. j.s.oxford@retroscreen.com

    , , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Acetamides
    Amantadine
    Antiviral Agents
    Clinical Trials as Topic
    Disease Outbreaks
    Endemic Diseases
    Enzyme Inhibitors
    Guanidines
    Humans
    Influenza, Human
    Neuraminidase
    Oseltamivir
    Pyrans
    Rimantadine
    Sialic Acids
    Viral Matrix Proteins
    Zanamivir

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12691538

    Citation

    Oxford, J S., et al. "Treatment of Epidemic and Pandemic Influenza With Neuraminidase and M2 Proton Channel Inhibitors." Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, vol. 9, no. 1, 2003, pp. 1-14.
    Oxford JS, Bossuyt S, Balasingam S, et al. Treatment of epidemic and pandemic influenza with neuraminidase and M2 proton channel inhibitors. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2003;9(1):1-14.
    Oxford, J. S., Bossuyt, S., Balasingam, S., Mann, A., Novelli, P., & Lambkin, R. (2003). Treatment of epidemic and pandemic influenza with neuraminidase and M2 proton channel inhibitors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, 9(1), pp. 1-14.
    Oxford JS, et al. Treatment of Epidemic and Pandemic Influenza With Neuraminidase and M2 Proton Channel Inhibitors. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2003;9(1):1-14. PubMed PMID: 12691538.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Treatment of epidemic and pandemic influenza with neuraminidase and M2 proton channel inhibitors. AU - Oxford,J S, AU - Bossuyt,S, AU - Balasingam,S, AU - Mann,A, AU - Novelli,P, AU - Lambkin,R, PY - 2003/4/15/pubmed PY - 2003/5/30/medline PY - 2003/4/15/entrez SP - 1 EP - 14 JF - Clinical microbiology and infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases JO - Clin. Microbiol. Infect. VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - A small armentarium of anti-influenza drugs now exists, and includes the M2 blockers (amantadine and rimantadine) and the neuraminidase inhibitors (Relenza and Tamiflu). The neuraminidase inhibitors have certain advantages, including a broader spectrum of antiviral activity, including influenza A and B viruses. On the other hand, there is now much clinical experience with the M2 blockers, and these drugs are inexpensive. It is clear that influenza in different community groups needs to be managed in specific and targeted ways. For example, in the over-65-years and at-risk groups, vaccination will remain a mainstay of disease prevention. However, up to 40% of those in these groups may fail to receive vaccine, and therefore the antivirals can be used therapeutically, or, in defined circumstances, as prophylactics. At present, influenza is hardly managed in the community. The infrequent global outbreaks, pandemics, present further problems. The more extensive use of the two classes of antivirals, and also vaccines, in the important interpandemic years will provide a very significant investment in health benefits in the face of a new pandemic virus in an otherwise completely vulnerable population. SN - 1198-743X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12691538/Treatment_of_epidemic_and_pandemic_influenza_with_neuraminidase_and_M2_proton_channel_inhibitors_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1198-743X(14)63832-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -