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Metabolic and hormonal effects of five common African diets eaten as mixed meals: the Cameroon Study.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Apr; 57(4):580-5.EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate glycaemic and insulinaemic index and in vitro digestibility of the five most common Cameroonian mixed meals consisting of rice+tomato soup (diet A), bean stew+plantains (B), foofoo corn+ndolé (C), yams+groundnut soup (D), and koki beans+cassava (E).

SUBJECTS

Ten healthy non-obese volunteers, aged 19-31 y, with no family history of diabetes or hypertension.

INTERVENTIONS

A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test followed by the eating of the test diets with carbohydrate content standardized to 75 g every 4 days with blood samples taken at 0, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min. In vitro digestion of each diet according to Brand's protocol.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Plasma glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, insulin and C-peptide, with calculation of glycaemic and insulinaemic index defined as the area under the glucose and insulin response curve after consumption of a test food divided by the area under the curve after consumption of a control food containing the same amount of carbohydrate, and digestibility index.

RESULTS

Glycaemic index (GI) varied from 34.1 (diet C) to 52.0% (diet E) with no statistical difference between the diets, and insulinaemic index varied significantly from 40.2% (C) to 70.9% (A) (P=0.03). The digestibility index varied from 18.9 (C) to 60.8% (A) (P<0.0001), and did not correlate with glycaemic or insulinaemic indices. However, carbohydrate content correlated with GI (r=0.83; P=0.04), digestibility index (r=-0.70; P<0.01), and insulinaemic index (r=0.91; P<0.01). Plasma C-peptide and plasma lipids showed little difference over 180 min following the ingestion of each meal.

CONCLUSIONS

Glycaemic index of these African mixed meals are relatively low and might not be predicted by in vitro digestibility index.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé 1, Cameroon. jean-claude.mbanya@camnet.cmNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12700620

Citation

Mbanya, J-C N., et al. "Metabolic and Hormonal Effects of Five Common African Diets Eaten as Mixed Meals: the Cameroon Study." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 57, no. 4, 2003, pp. 580-5.
Mbanya JC, Mfopou JK, Sobngwi E, et al. Metabolic and hormonal effects of five common African diets eaten as mixed meals: the Cameroon Study. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003;57(4):580-5.
Mbanya, J. C., Mfopou, J. K., Sobngwi, E., Mbanya, D. N., & Ngogang, J. Y. (2003). Metabolic and hormonal effects of five common African diets eaten as mixed meals: the Cameroon Study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 57(4), 580-5.
Mbanya JC, et al. Metabolic and Hormonal Effects of Five Common African Diets Eaten as Mixed Meals: the Cameroon Study. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003;57(4):580-5. PubMed PMID: 12700620.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic and hormonal effects of five common African diets eaten as mixed meals: the Cameroon Study. AU - Mbanya,J-C N, AU - Mfopou,J K, AU - Sobngwi,E, AU - Mbanya,D N S, AU - Ngogang,J Y, AU - ,, PY - 2002/01/20/received PY - 2002/05/13/revised PY - 2003/4/18/pubmed PY - 2003/8/2/medline PY - 2003/4/18/entrez SP - 580 EP - 5 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 57 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate glycaemic and insulinaemic index and in vitro digestibility of the five most common Cameroonian mixed meals consisting of rice+tomato soup (diet A), bean stew+plantains (B), foofoo corn+ndolé (C), yams+groundnut soup (D), and koki beans+cassava (E). SUBJECTS: Ten healthy non-obese volunteers, aged 19-31 y, with no family history of diabetes or hypertension. INTERVENTIONS: A 75 g oral glucose tolerance test followed by the eating of the test diets with carbohydrate content standardized to 75 g every 4 days with blood samples taken at 0, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 180 min. In vitro digestion of each diet according to Brand's protocol. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Plasma glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, insulin and C-peptide, with calculation of glycaemic and insulinaemic index defined as the area under the glucose and insulin response curve after consumption of a test food divided by the area under the curve after consumption of a control food containing the same amount of carbohydrate, and digestibility index. RESULTS: Glycaemic index (GI) varied from 34.1 (diet C) to 52.0% (diet E) with no statistical difference between the diets, and insulinaemic index varied significantly from 40.2% (C) to 70.9% (A) (P=0.03). The digestibility index varied from 18.9 (C) to 60.8% (A) (P<0.0001), and did not correlate with glycaemic or insulinaemic indices. However, carbohydrate content correlated with GI (r=0.83; P=0.04), digestibility index (r=-0.70; P<0.01), and insulinaemic index (r=0.91; P<0.01). Plasma C-peptide and plasma lipids showed little difference over 180 min following the ingestion of each meal. CONCLUSIONS: Glycaemic index of these African mixed meals are relatively low and might not be predicted by in vitro digestibility index. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12700620/Metabolic_and_hormonal_effects_of_five_common_African_diets_eaten_as_mixed_meals:_the_Cameroon_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601592 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -