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Atopy in Norwegian and Russian adults: a population-based study from the common border area.
Allergy 2003; 58(4):357-62A

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several studies have concluded that atopy is more common in Western than in Eastern Europe. We aimed to study whether a similar difference exists between Norwegian and Russian adults living in geographically adjacent areas.

METHODS

A cross-sectional population-based study was performed in Sør- Varanger municipality (Norway) and in the cities of Nikel and Zapolyarny (Russia). The Russian cities are heavily polluted by sulfur dioxide from local nickel industry. In addition to questionnaire information, results on IgE sensitization (S-Phadiatop, Pharmacia & Upjohn, Uppsala, Sweden) were obtained from 3134 Norwegian and 709 Russian participants.

RESULTS

A positive Phadiatop was found in 20.7% of the Norwegians (men 21.9%, women 19.7%) and in 27.5% of the Russians (men 35.7%, women 23.0%); the sex- and age-adjusted relative risk of testing positive in Russia being 1.49 (95% CI 1.23-1.81). The Norwegian participants reported more atopic dermatitis and hay fever, although this difference was statistically significant only for atopic dermatitis in women.

CONCLUSION

IgE sensitization was more common in Russia than in Norway, unlike findings from other east-west European studies. The Russians did not, however, report more atopic diseases. This discrepancy might reflect different awareness of allergies in the two countries and demonstrates the need for objective markers of atopy when comparing prevalence in different populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12708987

Citation

Smith-Sivertsen, T, et al. "Atopy in Norwegian and Russian Adults: a Population-based Study From the Common Border Area." Allergy, vol. 58, no. 4, 2003, pp. 357-62.
Smith-Sivertsen T, Tchachtchine V, Lund E. Atopy in Norwegian and Russian adults: a population-based study from the common border area. Allergy. 2003;58(4):357-62.
Smith-Sivertsen, T., Tchachtchine, V., & Lund, E. (2003). Atopy in Norwegian and Russian adults: a population-based study from the common border area. Allergy, 58(4), pp. 357-62.
Smith-Sivertsen T, Tchachtchine V, Lund E. Atopy in Norwegian and Russian Adults: a Population-based Study From the Common Border Area. Allergy. 2003;58(4):357-62. PubMed PMID: 12708987.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Atopy in Norwegian and Russian adults: a population-based study from the common border area. AU - Smith-Sivertsen,T, AU - Tchachtchine,V, AU - Lund,E, PY - 2003/4/24/pubmed PY - 2003/9/3/medline PY - 2003/4/24/entrez SP - 357 EP - 62 JF - Allergy JO - Allergy VL - 58 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several studies have concluded that atopy is more common in Western than in Eastern Europe. We aimed to study whether a similar difference exists between Norwegian and Russian adults living in geographically adjacent areas. METHODS: A cross-sectional population-based study was performed in Sør- Varanger municipality (Norway) and in the cities of Nikel and Zapolyarny (Russia). The Russian cities are heavily polluted by sulfur dioxide from local nickel industry. In addition to questionnaire information, results on IgE sensitization (S-Phadiatop, Pharmacia & Upjohn, Uppsala, Sweden) were obtained from 3134 Norwegian and 709 Russian participants. RESULTS: A positive Phadiatop was found in 20.7% of the Norwegians (men 21.9%, women 19.7%) and in 27.5% of the Russians (men 35.7%, women 23.0%); the sex- and age-adjusted relative risk of testing positive in Russia being 1.49 (95% CI 1.23-1.81). The Norwegian participants reported more atopic dermatitis and hay fever, although this difference was statistically significant only for atopic dermatitis in women. CONCLUSION: IgE sensitization was more common in Russia than in Norway, unlike findings from other east-west European studies. The Russians did not, however, report more atopic diseases. This discrepancy might reflect different awareness of allergies in the two countries and demonstrates the need for objective markers of atopy when comparing prevalence in different populations. SN - 0105-4538 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12708987/Atopy_in_Norwegian_and_Russian_adults:_a_population_based_study_from_the_common_border_area_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0105-4538&date=2003&volume=58&issue=4&spage=357 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -