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Discriminative-stimulus effects of triazolam in light and moderate drinkers.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003 Apr; 27(4):638-46.AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The results of previous laboratory experiments with humans suggest that light and moderate drinkers respond differentially to the effects of benzodiazepines. The aim of this study was to further assess the behavioral effects of a benzodiazepine in light and moderate drinkers.

METHODS

To accomplish this aim, 12 volunteers (6 light drinkers and 6 moderate drinkers) learned to discriminate 0.375 mg of triazolam, a triazolobenzodiazepine hypnotic. After they learned this discrimination, a test-of-novel-doses phase was conducted in which a range of doses of triazolam (0, 0.06, 0.125, 0.25, and 0.375 mg) was tested in both groups of volunteers. The subject-rated and performance-impairing effects of triazolam were assessed concurrently.

RESULTS

There was not a significant difference between the groups in terms of the number of trials needed to learn the discrimination, nor did the proportion of light and moderate drinkers who learned to accurately discriminate 0.375 mg of triazolam differ significantly. The discriminative-stimulus, subject-rated, and performance-impairing effects of triazolam were an orderly function of dose but did not differ across the light and moderate drinkers.

CONCLUSIONS

Future studies should examine the discriminative-stimulus effects of a lower dose of triazolam (e.g., 0.25 mg) in light and moderate drinks or use a fading procedure to determine differences in terms of the lowest discriminable dose.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Behavioral Science, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA. crush2@uky.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12711926

Citation

Rush, Craig R., et al. "Discriminative-stimulus Effects of Triazolam in Light and Moderate Drinkers." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 27, no. 4, 2003, pp. 638-46.
Rush CR, Kelly TH, Fillmore MT, et al. Discriminative-stimulus effects of triazolam in light and moderate drinkers. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003;27(4):638-46.
Rush, C. R., Kelly, T. H., Fillmore, M. T., & Hays, L. R. (2003). Discriminative-stimulus effects of triazolam in light and moderate drinkers. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 27(4), 638-46.
Rush CR, et al. Discriminative-stimulus Effects of Triazolam in Light and Moderate Drinkers. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003;27(4):638-46. PubMed PMID: 12711926.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Discriminative-stimulus effects of triazolam in light and moderate drinkers. AU - Rush,Craig R, AU - Kelly,Thomas H, AU - Fillmore,Mark T, AU - Hays,Lon R, PY - 2003/4/25/pubmed PY - 2003/12/3/medline PY - 2003/4/25/entrez SP - 638 EP - 46 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. VL - 27 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The results of previous laboratory experiments with humans suggest that light and moderate drinkers respond differentially to the effects of benzodiazepines. The aim of this study was to further assess the behavioral effects of a benzodiazepine in light and moderate drinkers. METHODS: To accomplish this aim, 12 volunteers (6 light drinkers and 6 moderate drinkers) learned to discriminate 0.375 mg of triazolam, a triazolobenzodiazepine hypnotic. After they learned this discrimination, a test-of-novel-doses phase was conducted in which a range of doses of triazolam (0, 0.06, 0.125, 0.25, and 0.375 mg) was tested in both groups of volunteers. The subject-rated and performance-impairing effects of triazolam were assessed concurrently. RESULTS: There was not a significant difference between the groups in terms of the number of trials needed to learn the discrimination, nor did the proportion of light and moderate drinkers who learned to accurately discriminate 0.375 mg of triazolam differ significantly. The discriminative-stimulus, subject-rated, and performance-impairing effects of triazolam were an orderly function of dose but did not differ across the light and moderate drinkers. CONCLUSIONS: Future studies should examine the discriminative-stimulus effects of a lower dose of triazolam (e.g., 0.25 mg) in light and moderate drinks or use a fading procedure to determine differences in terms of the lowest discriminable dose. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12711926/Discriminative_stimulus_effects_of_triazolam_in_light_and_moderate_drinkers_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0145-6008&date=2003&volume=27&issue=4&spage=638 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -