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Evidence for lower sympathetic nerve activity in young adults with low birth weight.
J Hypertens. 2003 May; 21(5):943-50.JH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

A dysfunction of the sympathetic nervous system may contribute to the development of hypertension and obesity in subjects with low birth weight (LBW). The present study examines resting sympathetic nerve traffic and its baroreflex modulation to the muscle vascular bed in healthy LBW subjects.

DESIGN

Case-control studies of 13 healthy LBW subjects (< 2500 g at term) aged 20-30 years and 13 normal birth weight subjects (NBW; 3200-3700 g) closely matched for age, gender and body mass index.

METHODS

Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) recordings from the superficial peroneal nerve, blood pressure and heart rate were obtained at rest, during an inspiratory apnoea and a cold pressor test. Baroreflex function was evaluated by short-term infusion of nitroprusside and phenylephrine, respectively, in nine subjects of each group.

RESULTS

During resting conditions burst frequency was significantly lower in LBW subjects (LBW: 24.7 +/- 2.4; NBW: 34.4 +/- 2.1 bursts/min, P < 0.05). When normalized for the different baseline values, baroreflex-mediated changes in MSNA were similar in both groups. Maximal MSNA levels in response to inspiratory apnoea and the cold pressor test did not differ between the groups. Blood pressure and heart rate were similar in LBW and NBW subjects both at rest and during sympatho-excitatory manoeuvres.

CONCLUSIONS

Subjects born too small for their gestational age show a significantly lower sympathetic nerve activity under baseline conditions. Given the different baseline values, the sympathetic response to haemodynamic alteration is not affected in LBW subjects, and maximal activation during non-haemodynamic sympatho-excitatory manoeuvres is preserved.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine I, Medical University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12714869

Citation

Weitz, Gunther, et al. "Evidence for Lower Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Young Adults With Low Birth Weight." Journal of Hypertension, vol. 21, no. 5, 2003, pp. 943-50.
Weitz G, Deckert P, Heindl S, et al. Evidence for lower sympathetic nerve activity in young adults with low birth weight. J Hypertens. 2003;21(5):943-50.
Weitz, G., Deckert, P., Heindl, S., Struck, J., Perras, B., & Dodt, C. (2003). Evidence for lower sympathetic nerve activity in young adults with low birth weight. Journal of Hypertension, 21(5), 943-50.
Weitz G, et al. Evidence for Lower Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Young Adults With Low Birth Weight. J Hypertens. 2003;21(5):943-50. PubMed PMID: 12714869.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evidence for lower sympathetic nerve activity in young adults with low birth weight. AU - Weitz,Gunther, AU - Deckert,Philippe, AU - Heindl,Silke, AU - Struck,Jan, AU - Perras,Boris, AU - Dodt,Christoph, PY - 2003/4/26/pubmed PY - 2004/2/6/medline PY - 2003/4/26/entrez SP - 943 EP - 50 JF - Journal of hypertension JO - J Hypertens VL - 21 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: A dysfunction of the sympathetic nervous system may contribute to the development of hypertension and obesity in subjects with low birth weight (LBW). The present study examines resting sympathetic nerve traffic and its baroreflex modulation to the muscle vascular bed in healthy LBW subjects. DESIGN: Case-control studies of 13 healthy LBW subjects (< 2500 g at term) aged 20-30 years and 13 normal birth weight subjects (NBW; 3200-3700 g) closely matched for age, gender and body mass index. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) recordings from the superficial peroneal nerve, blood pressure and heart rate were obtained at rest, during an inspiratory apnoea and a cold pressor test. Baroreflex function was evaluated by short-term infusion of nitroprusside and phenylephrine, respectively, in nine subjects of each group. RESULTS: During resting conditions burst frequency was significantly lower in LBW subjects (LBW: 24.7 +/- 2.4; NBW: 34.4 +/- 2.1 bursts/min, P < 0.05). When normalized for the different baseline values, baroreflex-mediated changes in MSNA were similar in both groups. Maximal MSNA levels in response to inspiratory apnoea and the cold pressor test did not differ between the groups. Blood pressure and heart rate were similar in LBW and NBW subjects both at rest and during sympatho-excitatory manoeuvres. CONCLUSIONS: Subjects born too small for their gestational age show a significantly lower sympathetic nerve activity under baseline conditions. Given the different baseline values, the sympathetic response to haemodynamic alteration is not affected in LBW subjects, and maximal activation during non-haemodynamic sympatho-excitatory manoeuvres is preserved. SN - 0263-6352 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12714869/Evidence_for_lower_sympathetic_nerve_activity_in_young_adults_with_low_birth_weight_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/00004872-200305000-00019 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -