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Photolysis of atrazine and ametryne herbicides in Barbados sugar cane plantation soils and water.
J Environ Sci Health B. 2003 May; 38(3):293-303.JE

Abstract

The photodegradation kinetics of atrazine (2-chloro-6-(ethylamino)-4-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) and ametryne (2-methylthio-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine), in fresh and coastal salt water from Barbados, were measured under irradiation with artificial solar and UV254-radiation. The first-order rate constants were greater for ametryne than for atrazine, and the rates were reduced in seawater relative to fresh water, and in soil slurries relative to fresh water. However, rates were accelerated in the presence of iron(III) at pH 3 due to photo-Fenton type processes. This rate enhancement was reduced at ambient pH values (pH 7-7.5) representative of surface water in Barbados. These results have important implications for the relative persistence of these contaminants in aquatic environments in tropical areas.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Environmental Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12716047

Citation

McMartin, Dena W., et al. "Photolysis of Atrazine and Ametryne Herbicides in Barbados Sugar Cane Plantation Soils and Water." Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part. B, Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes, vol. 38, no. 3, 2003, pp. 293-303.
McMartin DW, Headley JV, Wood BP, et al. Photolysis of atrazine and ametryne herbicides in Barbados sugar cane plantation soils and water. J Environ Sci Health B. 2003;38(3):293-303.
McMartin, D. W., Headley, J. V., Wood, B. P., & Gillies, J. A. (2003). Photolysis of atrazine and ametryne herbicides in Barbados sugar cane plantation soils and water. Journal of Environmental Science and Health. Part. B, Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes, 38(3), 293-303.
McMartin DW, et al. Photolysis of Atrazine and Ametryne Herbicides in Barbados Sugar Cane Plantation Soils and Water. J Environ Sci Health B. 2003;38(3):293-303. PubMed PMID: 12716047.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Photolysis of atrazine and ametryne herbicides in Barbados sugar cane plantation soils and water. AU - McMartin,Dena W, AU - Headley,John V, AU - Wood,Beverley P, AU - Gillies,Jon A, PY - 2003/4/29/pubmed PY - 2003/6/20/medline PY - 2003/4/29/entrez SP - 293 EP - 303 JF - Journal of environmental science and health. Part. B, Pesticides, food contaminants, and agricultural wastes JO - J Environ Sci Health B VL - 38 IS - 3 N2 - The photodegradation kinetics of atrazine (2-chloro-6-(ethylamino)-4-isopropylamino-1,3,5-triazine) and ametryne (2-methylthio-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine), in fresh and coastal salt water from Barbados, were measured under irradiation with artificial solar and UV254-radiation. The first-order rate constants were greater for ametryne than for atrazine, and the rates were reduced in seawater relative to fresh water, and in soil slurries relative to fresh water. However, rates were accelerated in the presence of iron(III) at pH 3 due to photo-Fenton type processes. This rate enhancement was reduced at ambient pH values (pH 7-7.5) representative of surface water in Barbados. These results have important implications for the relative persistence of these contaminants in aquatic environments in tropical areas. SN - 0360-1234 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12716047/Photolysis_of_atrazine_and_ametryne_herbicides_in_Barbados_sugar_cane_plantation_soils_and_water_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1081/PFC-120019896 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -