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Pathological analysis of congenital cervical cysts in children: 20 years of experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital.
Chang Gung Med J. 2003 Feb; 26(2):107-13.CG

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Congenital cervical cysts are frequently encountered in pediatric populations, and constitute one of the most intriguing areas of pediatric pathology. This report analyzes cervical cysts in Taiwanese children diagnosed at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CGMH) over the past 20 years. The pathologic and clinical findings are reviewed.

METHODS

Files on 331 patients under the age of 18 years, with a diagnosis of congenital cervical cyst at CGMH from January 1, 1983 to June 30, 2002, were retrieved from the Department of Pathology. There were 204 boys and 127 girls. We reviewed the histology of all cases and correlated it with clinical information in the medical records.

RESULTS

Thyroglossal duct cysts, the most common congenital neck cyst, accounted for 54.68% of all cases, followed by cystic hygromas (25.08%), branchial cleft cysts (16.31%), bronchogenic cysts (0.91%), and thymic cysts (0.30%). Nine cases (2.72%) remained unclassified.

CONCLUSIONS

This is the largest series regarding pediatric cervical cysts in the literature to date. Thyroglossal duct cysts were the most common congenital cervical cyst encountered. Our experience indicates that each type of cyst has its unique location in the neck and is highly associated with its embryonic origin. Complete and precise clinical information is a prerequisite in order for pathologists to make accurate diagnoses of congenital cervical cysts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taipei.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12718387

Citation

Hsieh, Yi-Yueh, et al. "Pathological Analysis of Congenital Cervical Cysts in Children: 20 Years of Experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital." Chang Gung Medical Journal, vol. 26, no. 2, 2003, pp. 107-13.
Hsieh YY, Hsueh S, Hsueh C, et al. Pathological analysis of congenital cervical cysts in children: 20 years of experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Chang Gung Med J. 2003;26(2):107-13.
Hsieh, Y. Y., Hsueh, S., Hsueh, C., Lin, J. N., Luo, C. C., Lai, J. Y., & Huang, C. S. (2003). Pathological analysis of congenital cervical cysts in children: 20 years of experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Chang Gung Medical Journal, 26(2), 107-13.
Hsieh YY, et al. Pathological Analysis of Congenital Cervical Cysts in Children: 20 Years of Experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Chang Gung Med J. 2003;26(2):107-13. PubMed PMID: 12718387.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pathological analysis of congenital cervical cysts in children: 20 years of experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. AU - Hsieh,Yi-Yueh, AU - Hsueh,Swei, AU - Hsueh,Chuen, AU - Lin,Jer-Nan, AU - Luo,Chih-Cheng, AU - Lai,Jin-Yao, AU - Huang,Chen-Sheng, PY - 2003/4/30/pubmed PY - 2003/5/16/medline PY - 2003/4/30/entrez SP - 107 EP - 13 JF - Chang Gung medical journal JO - Chang Gung Med J VL - 26 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Congenital cervical cysts are frequently encountered in pediatric populations, and constitute one of the most intriguing areas of pediatric pathology. This report analyzes cervical cysts in Taiwanese children diagnosed at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CGMH) over the past 20 years. The pathologic and clinical findings are reviewed. METHODS: Files on 331 patients under the age of 18 years, with a diagnosis of congenital cervical cyst at CGMH from January 1, 1983 to June 30, 2002, were retrieved from the Department of Pathology. There were 204 boys and 127 girls. We reviewed the histology of all cases and correlated it with clinical information in the medical records. RESULTS: Thyroglossal duct cysts, the most common congenital neck cyst, accounted for 54.68% of all cases, followed by cystic hygromas (25.08%), branchial cleft cysts (16.31%), bronchogenic cysts (0.91%), and thymic cysts (0.30%). Nine cases (2.72%) remained unclassified. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest series regarding pediatric cervical cysts in the literature to date. Thyroglossal duct cysts were the most common congenital cervical cyst encountered. Our experience indicates that each type of cyst has its unique location in the neck and is highly associated with its embryonic origin. Complete and precise clinical information is a prerequisite in order for pathologists to make accurate diagnoses of congenital cervical cysts. SN - 2072-0939 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12718387/Pathological_analysis_of_congenital_cervical_cysts_in_children:_20_years_of_experience_at_Chang_Gung_Memorial_Hospital_ L2 - http://cgmj.cgu.edu.tw/2602/260204.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -