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Iron depletion without anemia is not associated with impaired selenium status in college-aged women.
Biol Trace Elem Res. 2003 Feb; 91(2):125-36.BT

Abstract

Iron-deficiency anemia has been shown to alter body mineral concentrations and activities of iron- and non-iron-containing enzymes, especially those with antioxidant functions. These effects, however, have been less studied in nonanemic iron-depleted individuals. Thus, this study assessed indices of selenium status in 12 college-aged females with adequate iron stores and 15 college-aged females with low iron stores before and after iron therapy. Blood samples were drawn at baseline for both groups and following iron supplementation in the low-iron-stores group. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and serum ferritin concentrations of the low iron- stores group were significantly lower than those of the control group. The serum transferrin receptor-to-serum ferritin ratio in the low-iron stores group was significantly greater than that of the control group. Serum selenium and glutathione peroxidase concentrations of the low-iron-stores group were not significantly different from those of the controls. Iron supplementation significantly increased hemoglobin, hematocrit, and serum ferritin concentrations and significantly decreased the serum transferrin receptor concentration and serum transferrin receptor:serum ferritin ratio in the low-iron-stores group posttreatment compared to pretreatment. Serum selenium and glutathione peroxidase concentrations did not differ significantly from pretreatment to posttreatment in the low-iron-stores group. Results of this study indicate that low iron stores without anemia are not associated with impaired selenium status in college-aged females.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Food Science, 328 Spidle Hall, Auburn University, AL 36849, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12719607

Citation

McAnulty, Lisa S., et al. "Iron Depletion Without Anemia Is Not Associated With Impaired Selenium Status in College-aged Women." Biological Trace Element Research, vol. 91, no. 2, 2003, pp. 125-36.
McAnulty LS, Gropper SS, McAnulty SR, et al. Iron depletion without anemia is not associated with impaired selenium status in college-aged women. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2003;91(2):125-36.
McAnulty, L. S., Gropper, S. S., McAnulty, S. R., & Keith, R. E. (2003). Iron depletion without anemia is not associated with impaired selenium status in college-aged women. Biological Trace Element Research, 91(2), 125-36.
McAnulty LS, et al. Iron Depletion Without Anemia Is Not Associated With Impaired Selenium Status in College-aged Women. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2003;91(2):125-36. PubMed PMID: 12719607.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron depletion without anemia is not associated with impaired selenium status in college-aged women. AU - McAnulty,Lisa S, AU - Gropper,Sareen S, AU - McAnulty,Steven R, AU - Keith,Robert E, PY - 2002/05/24/received PY - 2002/06/16/accepted PY - 2003/4/30/pubmed PY - 2003/10/28/medline PY - 2003/4/30/entrez SP - 125 EP - 36 JF - Biological trace element research JO - Biol Trace Elem Res VL - 91 IS - 2 N2 - Iron-deficiency anemia has been shown to alter body mineral concentrations and activities of iron- and non-iron-containing enzymes, especially those with antioxidant functions. These effects, however, have been less studied in nonanemic iron-depleted individuals. Thus, this study assessed indices of selenium status in 12 college-aged females with adequate iron stores and 15 college-aged females with low iron stores before and after iron therapy. Blood samples were drawn at baseline for both groups and following iron supplementation in the low-iron-stores group. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and serum ferritin concentrations of the low iron- stores group were significantly lower than those of the control group. The serum transferrin receptor-to-serum ferritin ratio in the low-iron stores group was significantly greater than that of the control group. Serum selenium and glutathione peroxidase concentrations of the low-iron-stores group were not significantly different from those of the controls. Iron supplementation significantly increased hemoglobin, hematocrit, and serum ferritin concentrations and significantly decreased the serum transferrin receptor concentration and serum transferrin receptor:serum ferritin ratio in the low-iron-stores group posttreatment compared to pretreatment. Serum selenium and glutathione peroxidase concentrations did not differ significantly from pretreatment to posttreatment in the low-iron-stores group. Results of this study indicate that low iron stores without anemia are not associated with impaired selenium status in college-aged females. SN - 0163-4984 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12719607/Iron_depletion_without_anemia_is_not_associated_with_impaired_selenium_status_in_college_aged_women_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1385/BTER:91:2:125 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -