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Kava: herbal panacea or liver poison?
Med J Aust. 2003 May 05; 178(9):451-3.MJ

Abstract

Following reports of liver toxicity, including liver failure, associated with extracts from the Pacific islands plant kava (Piper methysticum), these have been banned from sale as a herbal anxiolytic in many Western countries, to the detriment of Pacific island economies. Pacific Islanders have used kava extensively for centuries, without recognised liver toxicity. However, the population is small, and there has been no systematic evaluation of possible liver damage. For both economic and public health reasons, it is important to determine if kava is inherently hepatotoxic, and what the mechanisms of toxicity are. Such research could lead to safer kava extracts for sale in Western countries, or identification of a subpopulation who should not consume kava.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Fiji School of Medicine, Private Mail Bag, Suva, Fiji. r.moulds@fsm.ac.fjNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12720513

Citation

Moulds, Robert F W., and Joji Malani. "Kava: Herbal Panacea or Liver Poison?" The Medical Journal of Australia, vol. 178, no. 9, 2003, pp. 451-3.
Moulds RF, Malani J. Kava: herbal panacea or liver poison? Med J Aust. 2003;178(9):451-3.
Moulds, R. F., & Malani, J. (2003). Kava: herbal panacea or liver poison? The Medical Journal of Australia, 178(9), 451-3.
Moulds RF, Malani J. Kava: Herbal Panacea or Liver Poison. Med J Aust. 2003 May 5;178(9):451-3. PubMed PMID: 12720513.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Kava: herbal panacea or liver poison? AU - Moulds,Robert F W, AU - Malani,Joji, PY - 2003/01/30/received PY - 2003/03/28/accepted PY - 2003/5/2/pubmed PY - 2003/6/24/medline PY - 2003/5/2/entrez SP - 451 EP - 3 JF - The Medical journal of Australia JO - Med J Aust VL - 178 IS - 9 N2 - Following reports of liver toxicity, including liver failure, associated with extracts from the Pacific islands plant kava (Piper methysticum), these have been banned from sale as a herbal anxiolytic in many Western countries, to the detriment of Pacific island economies. Pacific Islanders have used kava extensively for centuries, without recognised liver toxicity. However, the population is small, and there has been no systematic evaluation of possible liver damage. For both economic and public health reasons, it is important to determine if kava is inherently hepatotoxic, and what the mechanisms of toxicity are. Such research could lead to safer kava extracts for sale in Western countries, or identification of a subpopulation who should not consume kava. SN - 0025-729X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12720513/Kava:_herbal_panacea_or_liver_poison L2 - https://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/178_09_050503/mou10043_fm.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -