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Physical activity and breast cancer risk among Asian-American women in Los Angeles: a case-control study.
Cancer. 2003 May 15; 97(10):2565-75.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To the authors' knowledge, there have been few studies published to date regarding physical activity patterns and breast cancer risk in Asian and Asian-American women.

METHODS

The authors conducted a population-based case-control study of 501 Asian-American women with incident breast cancer and a control group of 594 Asian-American women in Los Angeles County to evaluate the role of lifetime physical activity on breast cancer risk. Information concerning lifetime recreational physical activity (i.e., type of activity, duration [years], and frequency [average hours per week]) and occupational physical activity was obtained using a structured questionnaire that was administered in person.

RESULTS

Increasing years and levels (average metabolic equivalent [MET] hours per week) of lifetime recreational activity were associated with a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer after adjusting for demographic factors, migration history, and menstrual and reproductive factors. Compared with women who had no lifetime recreational physical activity, <or= 3 MET hours per week, > 3-6 MET hours per week, > 6-12 MET hours per week, and > 12 MET hours per week of activity were associated with significantly reduced risk, with odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) of 0.91 (0.55-1.49), 0.65 (0.39-1.10), 0.53 (0.31-0.90), and 0.47 (0.28-0.80), respectively (P value for trend < 0.001). The risk of breast cancer was associated inversely with occupational physical activity, although the result was not statistically significant.

CONCLUSIONS

The findings of the current study provide further support for the finding that physical activity has a protective role in breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12733156

Citation

Yang, Dongyun, et al. "Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Risk Among Asian-American Women in Los Angeles: a Case-control Study." Cancer, vol. 97, no. 10, 2003, pp. 2565-75.
Yang D, Bernstein L, Wu AH. Physical activity and breast cancer risk among Asian-American women in Los Angeles: a case-control study. Cancer. 2003;97(10):2565-75.
Yang, D., Bernstein, L., & Wu, A. H. (2003). Physical activity and breast cancer risk among Asian-American women in Los Angeles: a case-control study. Cancer, 97(10), 2565-75.
Yang D, Bernstein L, Wu AH. Physical Activity and Breast Cancer Risk Among Asian-American Women in Los Angeles: a Case-control Study. Cancer. 2003 May 15;97(10):2565-75. PubMed PMID: 12733156.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical activity and breast cancer risk among Asian-American women in Los Angeles: a case-control study. AU - Yang,Dongyun, AU - Bernstein,Leslie, AU - Wu,Anna H, PY - 2003/5/7/pubmed PY - 2003/5/23/medline PY - 2003/5/7/entrez SP - 2565 EP - 75 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 97 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: To the authors' knowledge, there have been few studies published to date regarding physical activity patterns and breast cancer risk in Asian and Asian-American women. METHODS: The authors conducted a population-based case-control study of 501 Asian-American women with incident breast cancer and a control group of 594 Asian-American women in Los Angeles County to evaluate the role of lifetime physical activity on breast cancer risk. Information concerning lifetime recreational physical activity (i.e., type of activity, duration [years], and frequency [average hours per week]) and occupational physical activity was obtained using a structured questionnaire that was administered in person. RESULTS: Increasing years and levels (average metabolic equivalent [MET] hours per week) of lifetime recreational activity were associated with a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer after adjusting for demographic factors, migration history, and menstrual and reproductive factors. Compared with women who had no lifetime recreational physical activity, <or= 3 MET hours per week, > 3-6 MET hours per week, > 6-12 MET hours per week, and > 12 MET hours per week of activity were associated with significantly reduced risk, with odds ratios (and 95% confidence intervals) of 0.91 (0.55-1.49), 0.65 (0.39-1.10), 0.53 (0.31-0.90), and 0.47 (0.28-0.80), respectively (P value for trend < 0.001). The risk of breast cancer was associated inversely with occupational physical activity, although the result was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the current study provide further support for the finding that physical activity has a protective role in breast cancer. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12733156/Physical_activity_and_breast_cancer_risk_among_Asian_American_women_in_Los_Angeles:_a_case_control_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.11364 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -