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Brain hyperthermia is induced by methamphetamine and exacerbated by social interaction.
J Neurosci 2003; 23(9):3924-9JN

Abstract

Hyperthermia is a symptom of methamphetamine (METH) intoxication and a factor implicated in neurotoxicity during chronic METH use. To characterize the thermic response to METH, it was injected once daily into rats at increasing doses (0, 1, 3, and 9 mg/kg, s.c.) while brain [nucleus accumbens (NAcc), hippocampus] and body (deep temporal muscle) temperatures were continuously monitored. METH produced dose-dependent hyperthermia, with brain structures (especially the NAcc) showing a more rapid and pronounced temperature increase than the muscle. At the highest dose, brain and body temperatures increased 3.5-4.0 degrees C above basal levels and remained elevated for 3-5 hr. Stressful and other high-activity situations such as interaction with a conspecific female are also known to induce a significant hyperthermic response in the rat. A combination of social interaction and METH administration was tested for additive effects. Male rats were exposed daily to a conspecific female for a total of 120 min, and METH was injected at the same doses 30 min after the initial contact with the female. An initial hyperthermic response (approximately 1.5 degrees C) to social interaction was followed by a large and prolonged hyperthermic response (3.5-5.0 degrees C, 5-7 hr at 9 mg/kg) to METH, which was again stronger in brain structures (especially in the NAcc) than in the muscle. Although the combined effect of the hyperthermic events was not additive, METH administration during social interaction produced stronger and longer-lasting increases in brain and body temperature than that induced by drug alone, heating the brain in some animals near its biological limit (>41 degrees C).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Behavioral Neuroscience Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse, Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12736362

Citation

Brown, P Leon, et al. "Brain Hyperthermia Is Induced By Methamphetamine and Exacerbated By Social Interaction." The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience, vol. 23, no. 9, 2003, pp. 3924-9.
Brown PL, Wise RA, Kiyatkin EA. Brain hyperthermia is induced by methamphetamine and exacerbated by social interaction. J Neurosci. 2003;23(9):3924-9.
Brown, P. L., Wise, R. A., & Kiyatkin, E. A. (2003). Brain hyperthermia is induced by methamphetamine and exacerbated by social interaction. The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 23(9), pp. 3924-9.
Brown PL, Wise RA, Kiyatkin EA. Brain Hyperthermia Is Induced By Methamphetamine and Exacerbated By Social Interaction. J Neurosci. 2003 May 1;23(9):3924-9. PubMed PMID: 12736362.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Brain hyperthermia is induced by methamphetamine and exacerbated by social interaction. AU - Brown,P Leon, AU - Wise,Roy A, AU - Kiyatkin,Eugene A, PY - 2003/5/9/pubmed PY - 2003/6/20/medline PY - 2003/5/9/entrez SP - 3924 EP - 9 JF - The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience JO - J. Neurosci. VL - 23 IS - 9 N2 - Hyperthermia is a symptom of methamphetamine (METH) intoxication and a factor implicated in neurotoxicity during chronic METH use. To characterize the thermic response to METH, it was injected once daily into rats at increasing doses (0, 1, 3, and 9 mg/kg, s.c.) while brain [nucleus accumbens (NAcc), hippocampus] and body (deep temporal muscle) temperatures were continuously monitored. METH produced dose-dependent hyperthermia, with brain structures (especially the NAcc) showing a more rapid and pronounced temperature increase than the muscle. At the highest dose, brain and body temperatures increased 3.5-4.0 degrees C above basal levels and remained elevated for 3-5 hr. Stressful and other high-activity situations such as interaction with a conspecific female are also known to induce a significant hyperthermic response in the rat. A combination of social interaction and METH administration was tested for additive effects. Male rats were exposed daily to a conspecific female for a total of 120 min, and METH was injected at the same doses 30 min after the initial contact with the female. An initial hyperthermic response (approximately 1.5 degrees C) to social interaction was followed by a large and prolonged hyperthermic response (3.5-5.0 degrees C, 5-7 hr at 9 mg/kg) to METH, which was again stronger in brain structures (especially in the NAcc) than in the muscle. Although the combined effect of the hyperthermic events was not additive, METH administration during social interaction produced stronger and longer-lasting increases in brain and body temperature than that induced by drug alone, heating the brain in some animals near its biological limit (>41 degrees C). SN - 1529-2401 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12736362/Brain_hyperthermia_is_induced_by_methamphetamine_and_exacerbated_by_social_interaction_ L2 - http://www.jneurosci.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12736362 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -