Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Constipation, laxative use, and colon cancer in a North Carolina population.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2003 Apr; 98(4):857-64.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to determine whether bowel movement frequency and laxative use and type were associated with risk of colon cancer in white and black men and women.

METHODS

We conducted a population-based, case-control study with equal representation by blacks. Eligible subjects between ages 40 and 80 yr residing in urban and rural communities in North Carolina were asked about bowel habits and laxatives during face-to-face interviews. There were 643 cases (349 white, 294 black) and 1048 controls (611 white, 437 black).

RESULTS

Constipation, defined as fewer than three reported bowel movements per wk, was associated with a greater than two-fold risk of colon cancer (OR 2.36; 95% CI = 1.41-3.93) adjusted for age, race, sex, and relevant confounders. The association was greater for women (OR 2.69; 95% CI = 1.46-4.94) than for men (OR 1.73; 95% CI = 0.61-4.88) and stronger in blacks than whites. Black women had the highest risk (OR 3.42; 95% CI = 1.60-7.34), which remained significant (OR 3.21; 95% CI = 1.46-7.04) even after excluding subjects with late stage (distant) disease. The OR for constipation was slightly higher for distal than for proximal colon cancers. There was no association with laxative use (OR 0.88; 95% CI = 0.69-1.11). Fiber commercial laxatives appeared to exert a protective effect in a small subgroup.

CONCLUSIONS

This study provides support for a positive association between constipation and increased risk for colon cancer. Women, especially black women with constipation, seem to be at the highest risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7080, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12738468

Citation

Roberts, Malcolm C., et al. "Constipation, Laxative Use, and Colon Cancer in a North Carolina Population." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 98, no. 4, 2003, pp. 857-64.
Roberts MC, Millikan RC, Galanko JA, et al. Constipation, laxative use, and colon cancer in a North Carolina population. Am J Gastroenterol. 2003;98(4):857-64.
Roberts, M. C., Millikan, R. C., Galanko, J. A., Martin, C., & Sandler, R. S. (2003). Constipation, laxative use, and colon cancer in a North Carolina population. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 98(4), 857-64.
Roberts MC, et al. Constipation, Laxative Use, and Colon Cancer in a North Carolina Population. Am J Gastroenterol. 2003;98(4):857-64. PubMed PMID: 12738468.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Constipation, laxative use, and colon cancer in a North Carolina population. AU - Roberts,Malcolm C, AU - Millikan,Robert C, AU - Galanko,Joseph A, AU - Martin,Christopher, AU - Sandler,Robert S, PY - 2003/5/10/pubmed PY - 2003/6/12/medline PY - 2003/5/10/entrez SP - 857 EP - 64 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 98 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether bowel movement frequency and laxative use and type were associated with risk of colon cancer in white and black men and women. METHODS: We conducted a population-based, case-control study with equal representation by blacks. Eligible subjects between ages 40 and 80 yr residing in urban and rural communities in North Carolina were asked about bowel habits and laxatives during face-to-face interviews. There were 643 cases (349 white, 294 black) and 1048 controls (611 white, 437 black). RESULTS: Constipation, defined as fewer than three reported bowel movements per wk, was associated with a greater than two-fold risk of colon cancer (OR 2.36; 95% CI = 1.41-3.93) adjusted for age, race, sex, and relevant confounders. The association was greater for women (OR 2.69; 95% CI = 1.46-4.94) than for men (OR 1.73; 95% CI = 0.61-4.88) and stronger in blacks than whites. Black women had the highest risk (OR 3.42; 95% CI = 1.60-7.34), which remained significant (OR 3.21; 95% CI = 1.46-7.04) even after excluding subjects with late stage (distant) disease. The OR for constipation was slightly higher for distal than for proximal colon cancers. There was no association with laxative use (OR 0.88; 95% CI = 0.69-1.11). Fiber commercial laxatives appeared to exert a protective effect in a small subgroup. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides support for a positive association between constipation and increased risk for colon cancer. Women, especially black women with constipation, seem to be at the highest risk. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12738468/Constipation_laxative_use_and_colon_cancer_in_a_North_Carolina_population_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -