Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in an African, urban inner city community.

Abstract

With the epidemiological transition phenomenon, more countries are expected to move from a disease pattern dominated by infectious diseases to one characterised by non-communicable diseases. Many developing countries are contending with infectious diseases as well as non-communicable diseases, yet little is known about the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in poor urban communities in developing countries. The objective of this community based study was to determine the prevalence of selected cardiovascular risk factors in an urban inner city community which had been followed up prospectively from 1993 to 1998. Results show that the prevalence of hypertension (Blood Pressure BP > 160/95 mm Hg) was 12.4 percent with an age-adjusted rate of 7.4 percent. This is higher than what is found in the rural parts of the country but much lower than what is generally observed in industrialized countries of the world. Though there was no significant difference in the proportion with hypertension by gender (P > 0.05), the mean systolic BP was significantly higher for men (123.9 +/- 23.9) mm Hg) than for women (120.6 +/- 26.8 mg Hg) t = 2.93, p < 0.01. The mean diastolic BP was similarly higher for men (75.8 +/- 14.9) mm Hg than women (74.0 +/- 14.9) mm Hg t = 2.76 p < 0.01). Eight percent of the study population were obese (BMI > 30), and generally, more women than men were obese. However, at ages 15-19 significantly more males than females were obese (X2 = 73, p < 0.01). Both mean systolic and diastolic BP increased with increasing weight. When adjusting for gender, the association between hypertension and other CVD risk factors remained similar for males and females and gender was not a modifier of the factors. Of the CVD risk factors studied, Age > 40 years and obesity, were significantly associated with the presence of hypertension in this community (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001), smoking, alcohol intake and gender were not (P > 0.05). It is necessary to implement a national plan for the control of cardiovascular diseases in order to reduce and keep to minimum cardiovascular diseases and its complications in the country.

Authors+Show Affiliations

,

Department of Community Medicine, College of Medicine, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

, , , , ,

Source

MeSH

Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Alcohol Drinking
Cardiovascular Diseases
Developing Countries
Female
Health Transition
Humans
Hypertension
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Obesity
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk Factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking
Urban Health

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12744569

Citation

Lawoyin, T O., et al. "Prevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in an African, Urban Inner City Community." West African Journal of Medicine, vol. 21, no. 3, 2002, pp. 208-11.
Lawoyin TO, Asuzu MC, Kaufman J, et al. Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in an African, urban inner city community. West Afr J Med. 2002;21(3):208-11.
Lawoyin, T. O., Asuzu, M. C., Kaufman, J., Rotimi, C., Owoaje, E., Johnson, L., & Cooper, R. (2002). Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in an African, urban inner city community. West African Journal of Medicine, 21(3), pp. 208-11.
Lawoyin TO, et al. Prevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in an African, Urban Inner City Community. West Afr J Med. 2002;21(3):208-11. PubMed PMID: 12744569.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in an African, urban inner city community. AU - Lawoyin,T O, AU - Asuzu,M C, AU - Kaufman,J, AU - Rotimi,C, AU - Owoaje,E, AU - Johnson,L, AU - Cooper,R, PY - 2003/5/15/pubmed PY - 2003/6/5/medline PY - 2003/5/15/entrez SP - 208 EP - 11 JF - West African journal of medicine JO - West Afr J Med VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - With the epidemiological transition phenomenon, more countries are expected to move from a disease pattern dominated by infectious diseases to one characterised by non-communicable diseases. Many developing countries are contending with infectious diseases as well as non-communicable diseases, yet little is known about the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in poor urban communities in developing countries. The objective of this community based study was to determine the prevalence of selected cardiovascular risk factors in an urban inner city community which had been followed up prospectively from 1993 to 1998. Results show that the prevalence of hypertension (Blood Pressure BP > 160/95 mm Hg) was 12.4 percent with an age-adjusted rate of 7.4 percent. This is higher than what is found in the rural parts of the country but much lower than what is generally observed in industrialized countries of the world. Though there was no significant difference in the proportion with hypertension by gender (P > 0.05), the mean systolic BP was significantly higher for men (123.9 +/- 23.9) mm Hg) than for women (120.6 +/- 26.8 mg Hg) t = 2.93, p < 0.01. The mean diastolic BP was similarly higher for men (75.8 +/- 14.9) mm Hg than women (74.0 +/- 14.9) mm Hg t = 2.76 p < 0.01). Eight percent of the study population were obese (BMI > 30), and generally, more women than men were obese. However, at ages 15-19 significantly more males than females were obese (X2 = 73, p < 0.01). Both mean systolic and diastolic BP increased with increasing weight. When adjusting for gender, the association between hypertension and other CVD risk factors remained similar for males and females and gender was not a modifier of the factors. Of the CVD risk factors studied, Age > 40 years and obesity, were significantly associated with the presence of hypertension in this community (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001), smoking, alcohol intake and gender were not (P > 0.05). It is necessary to implement a national plan for the control of cardiovascular diseases in order to reduce and keep to minimum cardiovascular diseases and its complications in the country. SN - 0189-160X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12744569/Prevalence_of_cardiovascular_risk_factors_in_an_African_urban_inner_city_community_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/obesity.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -