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The group psychotherapy and home-based physical exercise (group-hope) trial in cancer survivors: physical fitness and quality of life outcomes.
Psychooncology. 2003 Jun; 12(4):357-74.P

Abstract

Physical exercise has been shown to enhance quality of life (QOL) in cancer survivors using pretest-posttest designs and compared to usual care (i.e. no intervention). In the present study, we conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine if exercise could improve QOL in cancer survivors beyond the known benefits of group psychotherapy (GP). We matched 22 GP classes (N=108) on content and then randomly assigned 11 (n=48) to GP alone and 11 (n=60) to GP plus home-based, moderate-intensity exercise (GP+EX). Participants completed a physical fitness test and QOL measures (e.g. Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy scales) at the beginning and end of GP classes (about 10 weeks). We had excellent recruitment (81%), retention (89%), and adherence (84%) rates and a modest contamination (22%) rate. Using intention-to-treat repeated measures analyses of variance, we found significant Time by Condition interactions for functional well-being, fatigue, and sum of skinfolds. We also found borderline significant interactions for physical well-being, satisfaction with life, and flexibility. All interactions favored the GP+EX condition. We conclude that a home-based, moderate intensity exercise program may im-prove QOL in cancer survivors beyond the benefits of GP, particularly in relation to physical and functional well-being.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Physical Education, University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada T6G 2H9. kerry.courneya@ualberta.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12748973

Citation

Courneya, Kerry S., et al. "The Group Psychotherapy and Home-based Physical Exercise (group-hope) Trial in Cancer Survivors: Physical Fitness and Quality of Life Outcomes." Psycho-oncology, vol. 12, no. 4, 2003, pp. 357-74.
Courneya KS, Friedenreich CM, Sela RA, et al. The group psychotherapy and home-based physical exercise (group-hope) trial in cancer survivors: physical fitness and quality of life outcomes. Psychooncology. 2003;12(4):357-74.
Courneya, K. S., Friedenreich, C. M., Sela, R. A., Quinney, H. A., Rhodes, R. E., & Handman, M. (2003). The group psychotherapy and home-based physical exercise (group-hope) trial in cancer survivors: physical fitness and quality of life outcomes. Psycho-oncology, 12(4), 357-74.
Courneya KS, et al. The Group Psychotherapy and Home-based Physical Exercise (group-hope) Trial in Cancer Survivors: Physical Fitness and Quality of Life Outcomes. Psychooncology. 2003;12(4):357-74. PubMed PMID: 12748973.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The group psychotherapy and home-based physical exercise (group-hope) trial in cancer survivors: physical fitness and quality of life outcomes. AU - Courneya,Kerry S, AU - Friedenreich,Christine M, AU - Sela,Rami A, AU - Quinney,H Arthur, AU - Rhodes,Ryan E, AU - Handman,Michael, PY - 2003/5/16/pubmed PY - 2003/9/26/medline PY - 2003/5/16/entrez SP - 357 EP - 74 JF - Psycho-oncology JO - Psychooncology VL - 12 IS - 4 N2 - Physical exercise has been shown to enhance quality of life (QOL) in cancer survivors using pretest-posttest designs and compared to usual care (i.e. no intervention). In the present study, we conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine if exercise could improve QOL in cancer survivors beyond the known benefits of group psychotherapy (GP). We matched 22 GP classes (N=108) on content and then randomly assigned 11 (n=48) to GP alone and 11 (n=60) to GP plus home-based, moderate-intensity exercise (GP+EX). Participants completed a physical fitness test and QOL measures (e.g. Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy scales) at the beginning and end of GP classes (about 10 weeks). We had excellent recruitment (81%), retention (89%), and adherence (84%) rates and a modest contamination (22%) rate. Using intention-to-treat repeated measures analyses of variance, we found significant Time by Condition interactions for functional well-being, fatigue, and sum of skinfolds. We also found borderline significant interactions for physical well-being, satisfaction with life, and flexibility. All interactions favored the GP+EX condition. We conclude that a home-based, moderate intensity exercise program may im-prove QOL in cancer survivors beyond the benefits of GP, particularly in relation to physical and functional well-being. SN - 1057-9249 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12748973/The_group_psychotherapy_and_home_based_physical_exercise__group_hope__trial_in_cancer_survivors:_physical_fitness_and_quality_of_life_outcomes_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.658 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -