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Investigations into the role of the thyrohyoid muscles in the pathogenesis of dorsal displacement of the soft palate in horses.
Equine Vet J. 2003 May; 35(3):258-63.EV

Abstract

REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY

Contributes to the understanding of the pathogenesis of dorsal displacement of the soft palate during exercise so that management of this condition could be enhanced.

HYPOTHESIS

That the thyrohyoid muscles play an important role in the stability of the laryngo-palatal relationship and that dysfunction of these muscles leads to dorsal displacement of the soft palate (DDSP) during exercise.

METHODS

Ten horses were exercised on a high-speed treadmill under 4 different treatment conditions: control conditions (n = 10), after resection of thyrohyoid muscles (TH, n = 10), after sham-treatment (n = 5), or after restoration of function of the thyrohyoid muscles with surgical sutures (prosthesis-treatment, n = 6). During trials, the following determinations were made: videoendoscopy of the upper airway, gait frequency and pharyngeal and tracheal static pressures.

RESULTS

None of the 10 horses developed DDSP during 2 separate treadmill-exercise trials under the control conditions. Seven of the 10 horses developed DDSP after resection of the TH muscles, 4 of 5 of these horses still experienced DDSP after sham-treatment, but 5 of 6 horses no longer experienced DDSP at exercise after the prosthesis-treatment. There were significant anomalies in airway pressures, respiratory frequency, and occurrence of DDSP in both the TH resection and sham-treatment conditions compared to control conditions. In contrast, no statistical differences were noted in any of the parameters measured between the prosthesis-treatment and control conditions.

CONCLUSIONS

That the function of the TH muscles is important to the stability of the laryngo-palatal relationship and plays a role in the pathophysiology of exercise-induced DDSP.

POTENTIAL RELEVANCE

Management of horses with DDSP could be enhanced by restoring the function of the TH muscles.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12755428

Citation

Ducharme, N G., et al. "Investigations Into the Role of the Thyrohyoid Muscles in the Pathogenesis of Dorsal Displacement of the Soft Palate in Horses." Equine Veterinary Journal, vol. 35, no. 3, 2003, pp. 258-63.
Ducharme NG, Hackett RP, Woodie JB, et al. Investigations into the role of the thyrohyoid muscles in the pathogenesis of dorsal displacement of the soft palate in horses. Equine Vet J. 2003;35(3):258-63.
Ducharme, N. G., Hackett, R. P., Woodie, J. B., Dykes, N., Erb, H. N., Mitchell, L. M., & Soderholm, L. V. (2003). Investigations into the role of the thyrohyoid muscles in the pathogenesis of dorsal displacement of the soft palate in horses. Equine Veterinary Journal, 35(3), 258-63.
Ducharme NG, et al. Investigations Into the Role of the Thyrohyoid Muscles in the Pathogenesis of Dorsal Displacement of the Soft Palate in Horses. Equine Vet J. 2003;35(3):258-63. PubMed PMID: 12755428.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Investigations into the role of the thyrohyoid muscles in the pathogenesis of dorsal displacement of the soft palate in horses. AU - Ducharme,N G, AU - Hackett,R P, AU - Woodie,J B, AU - Dykes,N, AU - Erb,H N, AU - Mitchell,L M, AU - Soderholm,L V, PY - 2003/5/21/pubmed PY - 2003/10/15/medline PY - 2003/5/21/entrez SP - 258 EP - 63 JF - Equine veterinary journal JO - Equine Vet J VL - 35 IS - 3 N2 - REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Contributes to the understanding of the pathogenesis of dorsal displacement of the soft palate during exercise so that management of this condition could be enhanced. HYPOTHESIS: That the thyrohyoid muscles play an important role in the stability of the laryngo-palatal relationship and that dysfunction of these muscles leads to dorsal displacement of the soft palate (DDSP) during exercise. METHODS: Ten horses were exercised on a high-speed treadmill under 4 different treatment conditions: control conditions (n = 10), after resection of thyrohyoid muscles (TH, n = 10), after sham-treatment (n = 5), or after restoration of function of the thyrohyoid muscles with surgical sutures (prosthesis-treatment, n = 6). During trials, the following determinations were made: videoendoscopy of the upper airway, gait frequency and pharyngeal and tracheal static pressures. RESULTS: None of the 10 horses developed DDSP during 2 separate treadmill-exercise trials under the control conditions. Seven of the 10 horses developed DDSP after resection of the TH muscles, 4 of 5 of these horses still experienced DDSP after sham-treatment, but 5 of 6 horses no longer experienced DDSP at exercise after the prosthesis-treatment. There were significant anomalies in airway pressures, respiratory frequency, and occurrence of DDSP in both the TH resection and sham-treatment conditions compared to control conditions. In contrast, no statistical differences were noted in any of the parameters measured between the prosthesis-treatment and control conditions. CONCLUSIONS: That the function of the TH muscles is important to the stability of the laryngo-palatal relationship and plays a role in the pathophysiology of exercise-induced DDSP. POTENTIAL RELEVANCE: Management of horses with DDSP could be enhanced by restoring the function of the TH muscles. SN - 0425-1644 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12755428/Investigations_into_the_role_of_the_thyrohyoid_muscles_in_the_pathogenesis_of_dorsal_displacement_of_the_soft_palate_in_horses_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0425-1644&date=2003&volume=35&issue=3&spage=258 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -