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Occupational exposure to HIV infection in health care workers.
Med Sci Monit. 2003 May; 9(5):CR197-200.MS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology of occupational exposure to HIV infection in health care workers (HCWs).

MATERIAL/METHODS

A survey from 4 hospitals between February 1995 and May 2001 identified 28 HCWs who had been exposed to HIV. The type of exposure to HIV, the circumstances of the incident, the safety precautions applied, and epidemiological information were evaluated in each case. A blood specimen for HIV serological testing was collected at the baseline visit and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months follow-up.

RESULTS

The study population consisted of 24 women and 4 men, mean age 34.7 +/- 5.8, including 15 nurses, 9 physicians, 2 nursing assistants, 1 morgue worker, and 1 medical student. These workers had been exposed to blood and infectious body fluid from patients who had AIDS (17 exposures), were HIV-antibody positive and symptomatic (3 exposures), or were HIV-antibody positive and asymptomatic (8 exposures). The exposure types included percutaneous injury (22) and blood or infectious body fluid contact with mucous membranes (2) or intact skin (4). Post-exposure chemoprophylaxis was used by 18 HCWs, 12 of whom reported side effects. None of the HCWs was HIV-seropositive in follow-up after occupational exposure.

CONCLUSIONS

Nurses are most at risk for occupational exposure to HIV infection. Post-exposure chemoprophylaxis is effective. Routine post-exposure management is also a good instrument to detect serological markers of HBV and HCV infection among HCWs and patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Infectious Diseases, Pomeranian University of Medicine, Szczecin, Poland. anita.wnuk@interia.pl

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12761457

Citation

Wnuk, Anita Małgorzata. "Occupational Exposure to HIV Infection in Health Care Workers." Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research, vol. 9, no. 5, 2003, pp. CR197-200.
Wnuk AM. Occupational exposure to HIV infection in health care workers. Med Sci Monit. 2003;9(5):CR197-200.
Wnuk, A. M. (2003). Occupational exposure to HIV infection in health care workers. Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research, 9(5), CR197-200.
Wnuk AM. Occupational Exposure to HIV Infection in Health Care Workers. Med Sci Monit. 2003;9(5):CR197-200. PubMed PMID: 12761457.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Occupational exposure to HIV infection in health care workers. A1 - Wnuk,Anita Małgorzata, PY - 2003/5/23/pubmed PY - 2004/2/24/medline PY - 2003/5/23/entrez SP - CR197 EP - 200 JF - Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research JO - Med Sci Monit VL - 9 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to determine the epidemiology of occupational exposure to HIV infection in health care workers (HCWs). MATERIAL/METHODS: A survey from 4 hospitals between February 1995 and May 2001 identified 28 HCWs who had been exposed to HIV. The type of exposure to HIV, the circumstances of the incident, the safety precautions applied, and epidemiological information were evaluated in each case. A blood specimen for HIV serological testing was collected at the baseline visit and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months follow-up. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 24 women and 4 men, mean age 34.7 +/- 5.8, including 15 nurses, 9 physicians, 2 nursing assistants, 1 morgue worker, and 1 medical student. These workers had been exposed to blood and infectious body fluid from patients who had AIDS (17 exposures), were HIV-antibody positive and symptomatic (3 exposures), or were HIV-antibody positive and asymptomatic (8 exposures). The exposure types included percutaneous injury (22) and blood or infectious body fluid contact with mucous membranes (2) or intact skin (4). Post-exposure chemoprophylaxis was used by 18 HCWs, 12 of whom reported side effects. None of the HCWs was HIV-seropositive in follow-up after occupational exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Nurses are most at risk for occupational exposure to HIV infection. Post-exposure chemoprophylaxis is effective. Routine post-exposure management is also a good instrument to detect serological markers of HBV and HCV infection among HCWs and patients. SN - 1234-1010 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12761457/Occupational_exposure_to_HIV_infection_in_health_care_workers_ L2 - https://www.medscimonit.com/download/index/idArt/11078 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -