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The effect of an oral glucose load on sodium and water excretion after rapid intravenous infusion of 0.9% (w/v) saline.
Clin Nutr 2003; 22(3):255-9CN

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Previous studies have suggested that oral or intravenous glucose enhances salt and water retention following a saline load. To test this, we studied the effects of an oral glucose load on urinary sodium and water excretion and serum biochemistry in response to a 2l intravenous infusion of 0.9% saline in normal subjects.

METHODS

A crossover study was conducted on six male volunteers. On one occasion, they received 2l 0.9% saline intravenously over 1h. A week later, they were given 100ml 50% dextrose orally prior to the same infusion. Subjects passed urine before start of the infusion. Body weight, haematocrit and serum biochemistry were recorded preinfusion and hourly for 6h. Urine was collected for 6h postinfusion and analysed for sodium, potassium and osmolality.

RESULTS

The six subjects had a mean (SE) age of 20.9 (0.4) years and BMI of 22.7 (0.2). Median (IQR) water balance over 6h was 1462 (1005-1650)ml after saline and 1203 (989-1735)ml after glucose and saline (NS). Urinary sodium and potassium excretion on the two occasions over 6h were 76 (69-111) vs 74 (92-174)mmol and 31 (29-40) vs 30 (20-36)mmol, respectively (NS). Using repeated measures testing, there was no significant difference in body weight, haematocrit, serum albumin, sodium, potassium, chloride, osmolality and blood glucose measured at hourly intervals on the two occasions.

CONCLUSIONS

In contrast to previous literature, in normal subjects, an additional oral glucose load does not appear to have an effect on urinary sodium excretion or serum biochemistry after a rapid 2l infusion of 0.9% saline. This does not preclude an effect under conditions of prior starvation or injury.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Surgery, University Hospital, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12765664

Citation

Lobo, D N., et al. "The Effect of an Oral Glucose Load On Sodium and Water Excretion After Rapid Intravenous Infusion of 0.9% (w/v) Saline." Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), vol. 22, no. 3, 2003, pp. 255-9.
Lobo DN, Simpson JA, Stanga Z, et al. The effect of an oral glucose load on sodium and water excretion after rapid intravenous infusion of 0.9% (w/v) saline. Clin Nutr. 2003;22(3):255-9.
Lobo, D. N., Simpson, J. A., Stanga, Z., & Allison, S. P. (2003). The effect of an oral glucose load on sodium and water excretion after rapid intravenous infusion of 0.9% (w/v) saline. Clinical Nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland), 22(3), pp. 255-9.
Lobo DN, et al. The Effect of an Oral Glucose Load On Sodium and Water Excretion After Rapid Intravenous Infusion of 0.9% (w/v) Saline. Clin Nutr. 2003;22(3):255-9. PubMed PMID: 12765664.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of an oral glucose load on sodium and water excretion after rapid intravenous infusion of 0.9% (w/v) saline. AU - Lobo,D N, AU - Simpson,J A D, AU - Stanga,Z, AU - Allison,S P, PY - 2003/5/27/pubmed PY - 2003/12/24/medline PY - 2003/5/27/entrez SP - 255 EP - 9 JF - Clinical nutrition (Edinburgh, Scotland) JO - Clin Nutr VL - 22 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Previous studies have suggested that oral or intravenous glucose enhances salt and water retention following a saline load. To test this, we studied the effects of an oral glucose load on urinary sodium and water excretion and serum biochemistry in response to a 2l intravenous infusion of 0.9% saline in normal subjects. METHODS: A crossover study was conducted on six male volunteers. On one occasion, they received 2l 0.9% saline intravenously over 1h. A week later, they were given 100ml 50% dextrose orally prior to the same infusion. Subjects passed urine before start of the infusion. Body weight, haematocrit and serum biochemistry were recorded preinfusion and hourly for 6h. Urine was collected for 6h postinfusion and analysed for sodium, potassium and osmolality. RESULTS: The six subjects had a mean (SE) age of 20.9 (0.4) years and BMI of 22.7 (0.2). Median (IQR) water balance over 6h was 1462 (1005-1650)ml after saline and 1203 (989-1735)ml after glucose and saline (NS). Urinary sodium and potassium excretion on the two occasions over 6h were 76 (69-111) vs 74 (92-174)mmol and 31 (29-40) vs 30 (20-36)mmol, respectively (NS). Using repeated measures testing, there was no significant difference in body weight, haematocrit, serum albumin, sodium, potassium, chloride, osmolality and blood glucose measured at hourly intervals on the two occasions. CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to previous literature, in normal subjects, an additional oral glucose load does not appear to have an effect on urinary sodium excretion or serum biochemistry after a rapid 2l infusion of 0.9% saline. This does not preclude an effect under conditions of prior starvation or injury. SN - 0261-5614 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12765664/The_effect_of_an_oral_glucose_load_on_sodium_and_water_excretion_after_rapid_intravenous_infusion_of_0_9__w/v__saline_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0261561402002030 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -