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Alcohol choice and amphetamine effects in light and moderate drinkers.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003 May; 27(5):804-11.AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The results of previously published reports suggest that light and moderate drinkers respond differently to the effects of commonly abused sedatives (e.g., diazepam or ethanol). The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether light and moderate drinkers respond differentially to the effects of ethanol and d-amphetamine.

METHODS

In the first phase of this experiment, volunteers (eight light drinkers and eight moderate drinkers) randomly sampled 0.5 g/kg of ethanol and placebo across two separate sessions. In the second phase, volunteers completed three sessions in which they chose either ethanol or placebo. In the third phase, volunteers received 0, 5, 10, and 15 mg of d-amphetamine. Each dose was tested twice. After drug administration in each phase, volunteers completed a battery of subject-rated, performance, and physiologic measures periodically for 5 hr.

RESULTS

Ethanol produced prototypical subject-rated effects (e.g., increased ratings on the Alcohol Sensation Scale), but it was chosen over placebo infrequently. Light and moderate drinkers did not differ in terms of the self-reported or reinforcing effects of ethanol. d-Amphetamine produced prototypical subject-rated stimulant-like effects (e.g., dose-dependent increases in ratings of High and Rush). Moderate drinkers reported significantly greater drug effects than light drinkers. Responses to ethanol reliably predicted subsequent responses to d-amphetamine on several measures.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this experiment suggest that even moderate ethanol use may increase an individual's vulnerability to abuse drugs. Future studies should determine whether light and moderate drinkers respond differentially to other commonly abused drugs (e.g., opioids) and whether behavioral responses to ethanol also predict responses to these compounds.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Behavioral Science, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0086, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12766625

Citation

Stoops, William W., et al. "Alcohol Choice and Amphetamine Effects in Light and Moderate Drinkers." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 27, no. 5, 2003, pp. 804-11.
Stoops WW, Fillmore MT, Poonacha MS, et al. Alcohol choice and amphetamine effects in light and moderate drinkers. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003;27(5):804-11.
Stoops, W. W., Fillmore, M. T., Poonacha, M. S., Kingery, J. E., & Rush, C. R. (2003). Alcohol choice and amphetamine effects in light and moderate drinkers. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 27(5), 804-11.
Stoops WW, et al. Alcohol Choice and Amphetamine Effects in Light and Moderate Drinkers. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003;27(5):804-11. PubMed PMID: 12766625.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol choice and amphetamine effects in light and moderate drinkers. AU - Stoops,William W, AU - Fillmore,Mark T, AU - Poonacha,Melania S, AU - Kingery,Joe E, AU - Rush,Craig R, PY - 2003/5/27/pubmed PY - 2003/8/30/medline PY - 2003/5/27/entrez SP - 804 EP - 11 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol. Clin. Exp. Res. VL - 27 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The results of previously published reports suggest that light and moderate drinkers respond differently to the effects of commonly abused sedatives (e.g., diazepam or ethanol). The purpose of this experiment was to determine whether light and moderate drinkers respond differentially to the effects of ethanol and d-amphetamine. METHODS: In the first phase of this experiment, volunteers (eight light drinkers and eight moderate drinkers) randomly sampled 0.5 g/kg of ethanol and placebo across two separate sessions. In the second phase, volunteers completed three sessions in which they chose either ethanol or placebo. In the third phase, volunteers received 0, 5, 10, and 15 mg of d-amphetamine. Each dose was tested twice. After drug administration in each phase, volunteers completed a battery of subject-rated, performance, and physiologic measures periodically for 5 hr. RESULTS: Ethanol produced prototypical subject-rated effects (e.g., increased ratings on the Alcohol Sensation Scale), but it was chosen over placebo infrequently. Light and moderate drinkers did not differ in terms of the self-reported or reinforcing effects of ethanol. d-Amphetamine produced prototypical subject-rated stimulant-like effects (e.g., dose-dependent increases in ratings of High and Rush). Moderate drinkers reported significantly greater drug effects than light drinkers. Responses to ethanol reliably predicted subsequent responses to d-amphetamine on several measures. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this experiment suggest that even moderate ethanol use may increase an individual's vulnerability to abuse drugs. Future studies should determine whether light and moderate drinkers respond differentially to other commonly abused drugs (e.g., opioids) and whether behavioral responses to ethanol also predict responses to these compounds. SN - 0145-6008 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12766625/Alcohol_choice_and_amphetamine_effects_in_light_and_moderate_drinkers_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0145-6008&date=2003&volume=27&issue=5&spage=804 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -