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Alcohol consumption and mortality in men with preexisting cerebrovascular disease.
Arch Intern Med 2003; 163(10):1189-93AI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In counseling patients with a history of stroke, clinicians have limited information regarding the risks and benefits of alcohol consumption.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the relationship between alcohol intake and risks of total and cardiovascular mortality in men with a history of stroke.

METHODS

The study population consisted of 112 528 men from the enrollment cohort of the Physicians' Health Study, 1320 of whom reported a baseline history of stroke. Men provided self-reported data on alcohol consumption, which was classified into 1 of 4 categories: rarely or never drink, very light (<1 drink per week), light (1-6 drinks per week), or moderate (> or =1 drink per day). Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the relative risks of mortality associated with alcohol consumption, after adjustment for major coronary risk factors.

RESULTS

During a mean follow-up of 4(1/2) years, 369 men died, 267 of whom died of cardiovascular disease. Compared with men with a history of stroke who drank rarely or never, those with a very light to moderate alcohol intake had multivariate relative risks for total mortality of 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60-1.28), 0.64 (95% CI, 0.48-0.85), and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.54-0.94), respectively (P =.03 for trend); and relative risks for cardiovascular mortality of 0.89 (95% CI, 0.58-1.36), 0.56 (95% CI, 0.40-0.79), and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.46-0.88) P =.008 for trend). Compared with age-adjusted models, adjustment for major coronary risk factors did not significantly change risk estimates for total or cardiovascular mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

These data indicate a possible inverse association between light to moderate alcohol intake and risks of total and cardiovascular mortality in men with a history of stroke. More data are needed to confirm or refute these results.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Massachusetts Veterans Epidemiology Research and Information Center, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA. vjackson@partners.org

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12767955

Citation

Jackson, Vicki A., et al. "Alcohol Consumption and Mortality in Men With Preexisting Cerebrovascular Disease." Archives of Internal Medicine, vol. 163, no. 10, 2003, pp. 1189-93.
Jackson VA, Sesso HD, Buring JE, et al. Alcohol consumption and mortality in men with preexisting cerebrovascular disease. Arch Intern Med. 2003;163(10):1189-93.
Jackson, V. A., Sesso, H. D., Buring, J. E., & Gaziano, J. M. (2003). Alcohol consumption and mortality in men with preexisting cerebrovascular disease. Archives of Internal Medicine, 163(10), pp. 1189-93.
Jackson VA, et al. Alcohol Consumption and Mortality in Men With Preexisting Cerebrovascular Disease. Arch Intern Med. 2003 May 26;163(10):1189-93. PubMed PMID: 12767955.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption and mortality in men with preexisting cerebrovascular disease. AU - Jackson,Vicki A, AU - Sesso,Howard D, AU - Buring,Julie E, AU - Gaziano,J Michael, PY - 2003/5/28/pubmed PY - 2003/6/20/medline PY - 2003/5/28/entrez SP - 1189 EP - 93 JF - Archives of internal medicine JO - Arch. Intern. Med. VL - 163 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: In counseling patients with a history of stroke, clinicians have limited information regarding the risks and benefits of alcohol consumption. OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship between alcohol intake and risks of total and cardiovascular mortality in men with a history of stroke. METHODS: The study population consisted of 112 528 men from the enrollment cohort of the Physicians' Health Study, 1320 of whom reported a baseline history of stroke. Men provided self-reported data on alcohol consumption, which was classified into 1 of 4 categories: rarely or never drink, very light (<1 drink per week), light (1-6 drinks per week), or moderate (> or =1 drink per day). Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the relative risks of mortality associated with alcohol consumption, after adjustment for major coronary risk factors. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 4(1/2) years, 369 men died, 267 of whom died of cardiovascular disease. Compared with men with a history of stroke who drank rarely or never, those with a very light to moderate alcohol intake had multivariate relative risks for total mortality of 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.60-1.28), 0.64 (95% CI, 0.48-0.85), and 0.71 (95% CI, 0.54-0.94), respectively (P =.03 for trend); and relative risks for cardiovascular mortality of 0.89 (95% CI, 0.58-1.36), 0.56 (95% CI, 0.40-0.79), and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.46-0.88) P =.008 for trend). Compared with age-adjusted models, adjustment for major coronary risk factors did not significantly change risk estimates for total or cardiovascular mortality. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate a possible inverse association between light to moderate alcohol intake and risks of total and cardiovascular mortality in men with a history of stroke. More data are needed to confirm or refute these results. SN - 0003-9926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12767955/Alcohol_consumption_and_mortality_in_men_with_preexisting_cerebrovascular_disease_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/vol/163/pg/1189 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -