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Effect of smoking on theophylline disposition.
Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1976 May; 19(5 Pt 1):546-51.CP

Abstract

The pharmacokinetics of theophylline were examined in a group of nonsmokers and in heavy smokers (1 to 2 packs/day) before and 3 to 4 mo after cessation of cigarette smoking. The half-life of theophylline in smokers averaged 4.3 (SD = 1.4) hr, significantly shorter than the mean value in nonsmokers (7.0, SD =1.7 hr). The apparent volume of distribution of theophylline was somewhat larger in smokers (0.50 +/-0.12 L/kg) than in nonsmokers (0.38 +/-0.04 L/kg). The body clearance of theophylline was appreciably larger and relatively more variable in smokers (100 +/-44 ml/min/1.73 m2) than in nonsmokers (45 +/-13 ml/min/1.73 m2). Serum concentrations of thiocyanate, a biotransformation product of cyanide which is inhaled with smoke, were used to monitor the smoking status of the subjects. The body clearances of theophylline showed a good correlation (r = 0.785, p less than 0.001) with the serum thiocyanate concentrations. Of the 8 smokers, only 4 managed to refrain from smoking for at least 3 mo, and these subjects showed no significant change in theophylline elimination. The increase in theophylline clearance caused by smoking is probably the result of induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes that do not readily normalize after cessation of smoking.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1277710

Citation

Hunt, S N., et al. "Effect of Smoking On Theophylline Disposition." Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol. 19, no. 5 Pt 1, 1976, pp. 546-51.
Hunt SN, Jusko WJ, Yurchak AM. Effect of smoking on theophylline disposition. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1976;19(5 Pt 1):546-51.
Hunt, S. N., Jusko, W. J., & Yurchak, A. M. (1976). Effect of smoking on theophylline disposition. Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 19(5 Pt 1), 546-51.
Hunt SN, Jusko WJ, Yurchak AM. Effect of Smoking On Theophylline Disposition. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1976;19(5 Pt 1):546-51. PubMed PMID: 1277710.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of smoking on theophylline disposition. AU - Hunt,S N, AU - Jusko,W J, AU - Yurchak,A M, PY - 1976/5/1/pubmed PY - 1976/5/1/medline PY - 1976/5/1/entrez SP - 546 EP - 51 JF - Clinical pharmacology and therapeutics JO - Clin Pharmacol Ther VL - 19 IS - 5 Pt 1 N2 - The pharmacokinetics of theophylline were examined in a group of nonsmokers and in heavy smokers (1 to 2 packs/day) before and 3 to 4 mo after cessation of cigarette smoking. The half-life of theophylline in smokers averaged 4.3 (SD = 1.4) hr, significantly shorter than the mean value in nonsmokers (7.0, SD =1.7 hr). The apparent volume of distribution of theophylline was somewhat larger in smokers (0.50 +/-0.12 L/kg) than in nonsmokers (0.38 +/-0.04 L/kg). The body clearance of theophylline was appreciably larger and relatively more variable in smokers (100 +/-44 ml/min/1.73 m2) than in nonsmokers (45 +/-13 ml/min/1.73 m2). Serum concentrations of thiocyanate, a biotransformation product of cyanide which is inhaled with smoke, were used to monitor the smoking status of the subjects. The body clearances of theophylline showed a good correlation (r = 0.785, p less than 0.001) with the serum thiocyanate concentrations. Of the 8 smokers, only 4 managed to refrain from smoking for at least 3 mo, and these subjects showed no significant change in theophylline elimination. The increase in theophylline clearance caused by smoking is probably the result of induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes that do not readily normalize after cessation of smoking. SN - 0009-9236 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1277710/Effect_of_smoking_on_theophylline_disposition_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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