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Childhood central nervous system viral infections and adult schizophrenia.
Am J Psychiatry. 2003 Jun; 160(6):1183-5.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

An earlier Finnish cohort study suggested that childhood viral CNS infections are associated with a fivefold increased odds of developing schizophrenia in adulthood. The authors sought to replicate this finding.

METHOD

From the archives of the Department of Virology of the National Public Health Institute in Finland, 320 individuals born between 1960 and 1976 who had suffered virologically confirmed CNS infections before their 15th birthdays were identified. Of the infections, 202 had been caused by enteroviruses. The sample was followed up in the 1969-2000 records of the National Hospital Discharge Register of Finland to identify all cases of schizophrenia that emerged.

RESULTS

The cumulative incidence of schizophrenia was 0.94% in the whole sample and 0.99% among individuals who had suffered enteroviral infections. These rates are comparable to that found in the general population.

CONCLUSIONS

Childhood viral CNS infections were not associated with increased risk of schizophrenia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Mental Health and Alcohol Research and the Deparment of Virology, National Puablic Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. jaana.suvisaari@ktl.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12777282

Citation

Suvisaari, Jaana, et al. "Childhood Central Nervous System Viral Infections and Adult Schizophrenia." The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 160, no. 6, 2003, pp. 1183-5.
Suvisaari J, Mautemps N, Haukka J, et al. Childhood central nervous system viral infections and adult schizophrenia. Am J Psychiatry. 2003;160(6):1183-5.
Suvisaari, J., Mautemps, N., Haukka, J., Hovi, T., & Lönnqvist, J. (2003). Childhood central nervous system viral infections and adult schizophrenia. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 160(6), 1183-5.
Suvisaari J, et al. Childhood Central Nervous System Viral Infections and Adult Schizophrenia. Am J Psychiatry. 2003;160(6):1183-5. PubMed PMID: 12777282.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Childhood central nervous system viral infections and adult schizophrenia. AU - Suvisaari,Jaana, AU - Mautemps,Nicolas, AU - Haukka,Jari, AU - Hovi,Tapani, AU - Lönnqvist,Jouko, PY - 2003/6/5/pubmed PY - 2003/7/24/medline PY - 2003/6/5/entrez SP - 1183 EP - 5 JF - The American journal of psychiatry JO - Am J Psychiatry VL - 160 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: An earlier Finnish cohort study suggested that childhood viral CNS infections are associated with a fivefold increased odds of developing schizophrenia in adulthood. The authors sought to replicate this finding. METHOD: From the archives of the Department of Virology of the National Public Health Institute in Finland, 320 individuals born between 1960 and 1976 who had suffered virologically confirmed CNS infections before their 15th birthdays were identified. Of the infections, 202 had been caused by enteroviruses. The sample was followed up in the 1969-2000 records of the National Hospital Discharge Register of Finland to identify all cases of schizophrenia that emerged. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of schizophrenia was 0.94% in the whole sample and 0.99% among individuals who had suffered enteroviral infections. These rates are comparable to that found in the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Childhood viral CNS infections were not associated with increased risk of schizophrenia. SN - 0002-953X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12777282/Childhood_central_nervous_system_viral_infections_and_adult_schizophrenia_ L2 - https://ajp.psychiatryonline.org/doi/10.1176/appi.ajp.160.6.1183?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -