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Difference in effect of myristic and stearic acid on plasma HDL cholesterol within 24 h in young men.
Eur J Clin Nutr 2003; 57(6):735-42EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

There is increasing evidence that postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG)-rich lipoproteins (TRL) may be related to atherogenic risk. Little is known about the acute effect of individual dietary saturated fatty acids on plasma lipids and lipoproteins.

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the effect of two prevalent dietary saturated fatty acids, stearic and myristic acid on postprandial and 24 h fasting plasma lipoprotein TAG and cholesterol concentrations.

DESIGN

Ten young healthy men were served two meals (1.2 g fat/kg body weight) containing fat enriched in either stearic acid (S) (shea butter) or myristic acid (M) (produced by inter-esterification) in a randomised, cross-over study. The meals were given in the morning after 12 h of fasting and again after 8 h (in the afternoon). The S and M containing meals were given at different days separated by a washout period. Blood samples were taken before the meal and 2,4,6,8, and 24 h after the first meal.

RESULTS

The M meal resulted in a higher postprandial HDL TAG response than S (P=0.03 I), (diet x time interaction), while no differences were observed in other lipid fractions. Twenty-four hours after the M meal fasting, HDL cholesterol was higher (P=0.05) and HDL TAG lower (P<0.001) than at baseline.

CONCLUSIONS

Intake of individual dietary SFA may affect fasting HDL cholesterol within 24 h. Thus after this short period HDL cholesterol concentration was higher after myristic acid than stearic acid. Myristic acid resulted in a higher increase in postprandial HDL TAG than stearic acid.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Department of Human Nutrition, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Rolighedsvej 30, DK-1958 Frederiksberg, Denmark. tine.tholstrup@fhe.kvl.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12792657

Citation

Tholstrup, T, et al. "Difference in Effect of Myristic and Stearic Acid On Plasma HDL Cholesterol Within 24 H in Young Men." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 57, no. 6, 2003, pp. 735-42.
Tholstrup T, Vessby B, Sandstrom B. Difference in effect of myristic and stearic acid on plasma HDL cholesterol within 24 h in young men. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003;57(6):735-42.
Tholstrup, T., Vessby, B., & Sandstrom, B. (2003). Difference in effect of myristic and stearic acid on plasma HDL cholesterol within 24 h in young men. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 57(6), pp. 735-42.
Tholstrup T, Vessby B, Sandstrom B. Difference in Effect of Myristic and Stearic Acid On Plasma HDL Cholesterol Within 24 H in Young Men. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003;57(6):735-42. PubMed PMID: 12792657.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Difference in effect of myristic and stearic acid on plasma HDL cholesterol within 24 h in young men. AU - Tholstrup,T, AU - Vessby,B, AU - Sandstrom,B, PY - 2003/6/7/pubmed PY - 2003/9/17/medline PY - 2003/6/7/entrez SP - 735 EP - 42 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 57 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: There is increasing evidence that postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG)-rich lipoproteins (TRL) may be related to atherogenic risk. Little is known about the acute effect of individual dietary saturated fatty acids on plasma lipids and lipoproteins. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of two prevalent dietary saturated fatty acids, stearic and myristic acid on postprandial and 24 h fasting plasma lipoprotein TAG and cholesterol concentrations. DESIGN: Ten young healthy men were served two meals (1.2 g fat/kg body weight) containing fat enriched in either stearic acid (S) (shea butter) or myristic acid (M) (produced by inter-esterification) in a randomised, cross-over study. The meals were given in the morning after 12 h of fasting and again after 8 h (in the afternoon). The S and M containing meals were given at different days separated by a washout period. Blood samples were taken before the meal and 2,4,6,8, and 24 h after the first meal. RESULTS: The M meal resulted in a higher postprandial HDL TAG response than S (P=0.03 I), (diet x time interaction), while no differences were observed in other lipid fractions. Twenty-four hours after the M meal fasting, HDL cholesterol was higher (P=0.05) and HDL TAG lower (P<0.001) than at baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Intake of individual dietary SFA may affect fasting HDL cholesterol within 24 h. Thus after this short period HDL cholesterol concentration was higher after myristic acid than stearic acid. Myristic acid resulted in a higher increase in postprandial HDL TAG than stearic acid. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12792657/Difference_in_effect_of_myristic_and_stearic_acid_on_plasma_HDL_cholesterol_within_24_h_in_young_men_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601605 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -