Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Impact of ready-to-eat breakfast cereal (RTEBC) consumption on adequacy of micronutrient intakes and compliance with dietary recommendations in Irish adults.
Public Health Nutr. 2003 Jun; 6(4):351-63.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe the consumption of ready-to-eat-breakfast cereals (RTEBCs) in Irish adults and its impact on adequacy and safety of micronutrient intakes and compliance with dietary recommendations.

DESIGN

Analysis for this paper used data from the North/South Ireland Food Consumption Survey that estimated habitual food intake using a 7-day food diary in a representative sample of adults aged 18-64 years (662 men, 717 women).

RESULTS

Despite the small quantity consumed (mean 28.6 g day-1 or 4.7% of total energy intake), RTEBCs made an important contribution to the mean daily intake of carbohydrate (8.1%), starch (10.8%), dietary fibre (9.8%) and non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) (10.8%) in consumers. Increased consumption was associated with a more fibre-dense diet and with greater compliance with dietary recommendations for fat, carbohydrate and NSP. Fortified RTEBCs contributed significantly to mean daily intakes of iron (18%), thiamin (14%), riboflavin (17%), niacin (15%), vitamin B6 (13%), total folate (18%) and vitamin D (10%) and most of the contribution was from micronutrients added to RTEBCs. Increased consumption of fortified RTEBCs was associated with an increased nutrient density for a number of micronutrients and with a lower prevalence of dietary inadequacy of calcium, iron, riboflavin and folate, particularly in women. However, it was not associated with intakes in excess of the Tolerable Upper Intake Level for any micronutrient.

CONCLUSIONS

The consumption of RTEBCs is associated with improved compliance with dietary recommendations for fat, carbohydrate and fibre, with a more micronutrient-dense diet and a reduced risk of dietary inadequacy for calcium, iron, riboflavin and folate, without increasing the risk of excessive intakes of micronutrients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Irish Universities Nutrition Alliance (IUNA) at: Department of Food Science, Food Technology and Nutrition, University College Cork, Republic of Ireland. marie.galvin@ucc.ieNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12795823

Citation

Galvin, M A., et al. "Impact of Ready-to-eat Breakfast Cereal (RTEBC) Consumption On Adequacy of Micronutrient Intakes and Compliance With Dietary Recommendations in Irish Adults." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 6, no. 4, 2003, pp. 351-63.
Galvin MA, Kiely M, Flynn A. Impact of ready-to-eat breakfast cereal (RTEBC) consumption on adequacy of micronutrient intakes and compliance with dietary recommendations in Irish adults. Public Health Nutr. 2003;6(4):351-63.
Galvin, M. A., Kiely, M., & Flynn, A. (2003). Impact of ready-to-eat breakfast cereal (RTEBC) consumption on adequacy of micronutrient intakes and compliance with dietary recommendations in Irish adults. Public Health Nutrition, 6(4), 351-63.
Galvin MA, Kiely M, Flynn A. Impact of Ready-to-eat Breakfast Cereal (RTEBC) Consumption On Adequacy of Micronutrient Intakes and Compliance With Dietary Recommendations in Irish Adults. Public Health Nutr. 2003;6(4):351-63. PubMed PMID: 12795823.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of ready-to-eat breakfast cereal (RTEBC) consumption on adequacy of micronutrient intakes and compliance with dietary recommendations in Irish adults. AU - Galvin,M A, AU - Kiely,M, AU - Flynn,A, PY - 2003/6/11/pubmed PY - 2003/12/10/medline PY - 2003/6/11/entrez SP - 351 EP - 63 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 6 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To describe the consumption of ready-to-eat-breakfast cereals (RTEBCs) in Irish adults and its impact on adequacy and safety of micronutrient intakes and compliance with dietary recommendations. DESIGN: Analysis for this paper used data from the North/South Ireland Food Consumption Survey that estimated habitual food intake using a 7-day food diary in a representative sample of adults aged 18-64 years (662 men, 717 women). RESULTS: Despite the small quantity consumed (mean 28.6 g day-1 or 4.7% of total energy intake), RTEBCs made an important contribution to the mean daily intake of carbohydrate (8.1%), starch (10.8%), dietary fibre (9.8%) and non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) (10.8%) in consumers. Increased consumption was associated with a more fibre-dense diet and with greater compliance with dietary recommendations for fat, carbohydrate and NSP. Fortified RTEBCs contributed significantly to mean daily intakes of iron (18%), thiamin (14%), riboflavin (17%), niacin (15%), vitamin B6 (13%), total folate (18%) and vitamin D (10%) and most of the contribution was from micronutrients added to RTEBCs. Increased consumption of fortified RTEBCs was associated with an increased nutrient density for a number of micronutrients and with a lower prevalence of dietary inadequacy of calcium, iron, riboflavin and folate, particularly in women. However, it was not associated with intakes in excess of the Tolerable Upper Intake Level for any micronutrient. CONCLUSIONS: The consumption of RTEBCs is associated with improved compliance with dietary recommendations for fat, carbohydrate and fibre, with a more micronutrient-dense diet and a reduced risk of dietary inadequacy for calcium, iron, riboflavin and folate, without increasing the risk of excessive intakes of micronutrients. SN - 1368-9800 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12795823/Impact_of_ready_to_eat_breakfast_cereal__RTEBC__consumption_on_adequacy_of_micronutrient_intakes_and_compliance_with_dietary_recommendations_in_Irish_adults_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980003000478/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -