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Parkinson's disease risks associated with dietary iron, manganese, and other nutrient intakes.
Neurology. 2003 Jun 10; 60(11):1761-6.Neur

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dietary influences on oxidative stress have been thought to play important role in the etiology of PD.

OBJECTIVE

To examine associations of PD with dietary nutrients, including minerals, vitamins, and fats.

METHODS

A population-based case-control study was conducted among newly diagnosed case (n = 250) and control subjects (n = 388) identified between 1992 and 2002 from enrollees of the Group Health Cooperative health maintenance organization in western Washington state. Controls were frequency matched to cases on sex and age. In-person interviews elicited data on food frequency habits during most of adult life. Nutrient intakes were calculated and analyzed by adjusting each person's nutrient intake by their total energy intake (the nutrient density technique).

RESULTS

Subjects with an iron intake in the highest quartile compared with those in the lowest quartile had an increased risk of PD (odds ratio = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.7, trend p = 0.016). There was an apparent joint effect of iron and manganese; dietary intake above median levels of both together conferred a nearly doubled risk compared with lower intakes of each nutrient (odds ratio = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.9). No strong associations were found for either antioxidants or fats.

CONCLUSION

A high intake of iron, especially in combination with high manganese intake, may be related to risk for PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Environmental Health, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle 98195-7234, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12796527

Citation

Powers, K M., et al. "Parkinson's Disease Risks Associated With Dietary Iron, Manganese, and Other Nutrient Intakes." Neurology, vol. 60, no. 11, 2003, pp. 1761-6.
Powers KM, Smith-Weller T, Franklin GM, et al. Parkinson's disease risks associated with dietary iron, manganese, and other nutrient intakes. Neurology. 2003;60(11):1761-6.
Powers, K. M., Smith-Weller, T., Franklin, G. M., Longstreth, W. T., Swanson, P. D., & Checkoway, H. (2003). Parkinson's disease risks associated with dietary iron, manganese, and other nutrient intakes. Neurology, 60(11), 1761-6.
Powers KM, et al. Parkinson's Disease Risks Associated With Dietary Iron, Manganese, and Other Nutrient Intakes. Neurology. 2003 Jun 10;60(11):1761-6. PubMed PMID: 12796527.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parkinson's disease risks associated with dietary iron, manganese, and other nutrient intakes. AU - Powers,K M, AU - Smith-Weller,T, AU - Franklin,G M, AU - Longstreth,W T,Jr AU - Swanson,P D, AU - Checkoway,H, PY - 2003/6/11/pubmed PY - 2004/2/26/medline PY - 2003/6/11/entrez SP - 1761 EP - 6 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 60 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dietary influences on oxidative stress have been thought to play important role in the etiology of PD. OBJECTIVE: To examine associations of PD with dietary nutrients, including minerals, vitamins, and fats. METHODS: A population-based case-control study was conducted among newly diagnosed case (n = 250) and control subjects (n = 388) identified between 1992 and 2002 from enrollees of the Group Health Cooperative health maintenance organization in western Washington state. Controls were frequency matched to cases on sex and age. In-person interviews elicited data on food frequency habits during most of adult life. Nutrient intakes were calculated and analyzed by adjusting each person's nutrient intake by their total energy intake (the nutrient density technique). RESULTS: Subjects with an iron intake in the highest quartile compared with those in the lowest quartile had an increased risk of PD (odds ratio = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.7, trend p = 0.016). There was an apparent joint effect of iron and manganese; dietary intake above median levels of both together conferred a nearly doubled risk compared with lower intakes of each nutrient (odds ratio = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.9). No strong associations were found for either antioxidants or fats. CONCLUSION: A high intake of iron, especially in combination with high manganese intake, may be related to risk for PD. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12796527/Parkinson's_disease_risks_associated_with_dietary_iron_manganese_and_other_nutrient_intakes_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=12796527 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -