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Effects of pulp mill solids and three composts on early growth of tomatoes.

Abstract

Compost has been proposed as a means of simultaneously diverting organic materials from landfills while producing a valuable product that improves tilth, organic matter content and nutrient supply of agricultural soils. Composts manufactured from different source materials may have markedly different properties however, even if they meet all regulatory requirements. We compared the capacity of composts made from three different combinations of organic wastes (horse manure and bedding, mink farm wastes, municipal solid waste (MSW) and sewage sludge) along with clarifier solids from a chemo-thermomechanical pulp mill, to enhance the growth of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) seedlings grown in nutrient-poor organic potting soil. Germination and seedling emergence of tomatoes, cress (Lapidium sativum L.) or radish (Raphanus sativus L.) were tested to assess phytotoxicity of the four amendments. Mink farm compost and horse manure compost stimulated root and shoot growth of tomato seedlings but MSW compost and pulp mill solids were strongly inhibitory. MSW compost and unamended potting soil also inhibited seedling emergence and pulp mill solids produced stunting and deformities in radish and cress seedlings. Both toxic constituents and nutrient imbalances may be responsible for the growth-inhibiting effects of these amendments. Application of pulp mill solids to agricultural soil without composting may lead to deleterious effects on vegetable crops.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Biology, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada B0H 1X0.

    Source

    Bioresource technology 89:3 2003 Sep pg 297-305

    MeSH

    Industrial Waste
    Lycopersicon esculentum
    Manure
    Paper
    Plant Shoots
    Seedlings
    Sewage
    Soil

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    12798121

    Citation

    Levy, J Simone, and Barry R. Taylor. "Effects of Pulp Mill Solids and Three Composts On Early Growth of Tomatoes." Bioresource Technology, vol. 89, no. 3, 2003, pp. 297-305.
    Levy JS, Taylor BR. Effects of pulp mill solids and three composts on early growth of tomatoes. Bioresour Technol. 2003;89(3):297-305.
    Levy, J. S., & Taylor, B. R. (2003). Effects of pulp mill solids and three composts on early growth of tomatoes. Bioresource Technology, 89(3), pp. 297-305.
    Levy JS, Taylor BR. Effects of Pulp Mill Solids and Three Composts On Early Growth of Tomatoes. Bioresour Technol. 2003;89(3):297-305. PubMed PMID: 12798121.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of pulp mill solids and three composts on early growth of tomatoes. AU - Levy,J Simone, AU - Taylor,Barry R, PY - 2003/6/12/pubmed PY - 2003/11/7/medline PY - 2003/6/12/entrez SP - 297 EP - 305 JF - Bioresource technology JO - Bioresour. Technol. VL - 89 IS - 3 N2 - Compost has been proposed as a means of simultaneously diverting organic materials from landfills while producing a valuable product that improves tilth, organic matter content and nutrient supply of agricultural soils. Composts manufactured from different source materials may have markedly different properties however, even if they meet all regulatory requirements. We compared the capacity of composts made from three different combinations of organic wastes (horse manure and bedding, mink farm wastes, municipal solid waste (MSW) and sewage sludge) along with clarifier solids from a chemo-thermomechanical pulp mill, to enhance the growth of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) seedlings grown in nutrient-poor organic potting soil. Germination and seedling emergence of tomatoes, cress (Lapidium sativum L.) or radish (Raphanus sativus L.) were tested to assess phytotoxicity of the four amendments. Mink farm compost and horse manure compost stimulated root and shoot growth of tomato seedlings but MSW compost and pulp mill solids were strongly inhibitory. MSW compost and unamended potting soil also inhibited seedling emergence and pulp mill solids produced stunting and deformities in radish and cress seedlings. Both toxic constituents and nutrient imbalances may be responsible for the growth-inhibiting effects of these amendments. Application of pulp mill solids to agricultural soil without composting may lead to deleterious effects on vegetable crops. SN - 0960-8524 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12798121/Effects_of_pulp_mill_solids_and_three_composts_on_early_growth_of_tomatoes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0960852403000658 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -