Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The emergency management of headaches.
Neurologist. 2003 Mar; 9(2):93-8.N

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Sufferers of severe headaches present for emergent treatment when attacks are unusually severe or refractory to therapy. Secondary headaches must always be considered.

REVIEW SUMMARY

Most severe attacks are due to migraine, but cluster headaches may present for emergent treatment as well. It is unusual for a tension-type headache to be severe, unless it is associated with migraine. Options for emergent treatment of migraine depend upon which treatments have been recently utilized and what associated symptoms are present.

CONCLUSIONS

Options include neuroleptics, triptans, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents, ergots, and intravenous valproic acid. Cluster headaches are best managed with oxygen inhalation, injectable sumatriptan, or dihydroergotamine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Columbia-Presbyterian Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10022, USA. mwg43@Columbia.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12808371

Citation

Green, Mark W.. "The Emergency Management of Headaches." The Neurologist, vol. 9, no. 2, 2003, pp. 93-8.
Green MW. The emergency management of headaches. Neurologist. 2003;9(2):93-8.
Green, M. W. (2003). The emergency management of headaches. The Neurologist, 9(2), 93-8.
Green MW. The Emergency Management of Headaches. Neurologist. 2003;9(2):93-8. PubMed PMID: 12808371.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The emergency management of headaches. A1 - Green,Mark W, PY - 2003/6/17/pubmed PY - 2004/9/8/medline PY - 2003/6/17/entrez SP - 93 EP - 8 JF - The neurologist JO - Neurologist VL - 9 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Sufferers of severe headaches present for emergent treatment when attacks are unusually severe or refractory to therapy. Secondary headaches must always be considered. REVIEW SUMMARY: Most severe attacks are due to migraine, but cluster headaches may present for emergent treatment as well. It is unusual for a tension-type headache to be severe, unless it is associated with migraine. Options for emergent treatment of migraine depend upon which treatments have been recently utilized and what associated symptoms are present. CONCLUSIONS: Options include neuroleptics, triptans, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents, ergots, and intravenous valproic acid. Cluster headaches are best managed with oxygen inhalation, injectable sumatriptan, or dihydroergotamine. SN - 1074-7931 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12808371/The_emergency_management_of_headaches_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -