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Ankyloglossia: does it matter?
Pediatr Clin North Am 2003; 50(2):381-97PC

Abstract

Ankyloglossia is an uncommon oral anomaly that can cause difficulty with breast-feeding, speech articulation, and mechanical tasks such as licking the lips and kissing. For many years the subject of ankyloglossia has been controversial, with practitioners of many specialties having widely different views regarding its significance. In many children, ankyloglossia is asymptomatic; the condition may resolve spontaneously, or affected children may learn to compensate adequately for their decreased lingual mobility. Some children, however, benefit from surgical intervention (frenotomy or frenuloplasty) for their tongue-tie. Parents should be educated about the possible long-term effects of tongue-tie while their child is young (< 1 year of age), so that they may make an informed choice regarding possible therapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Surgery/Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12809329

Citation

Lalakea, M Lauren, and Anna H. Messner. "Ankyloglossia: Does It Matter?" Pediatric Clinics of North America, vol. 50, no. 2, 2003, pp. 381-97.
Lalakea ML, Messner AH. Ankyloglossia: does it matter? Pediatr Clin North Am. 2003;50(2):381-97.
Lalakea, M. L., & Messner, A. H. (2003). Ankyloglossia: does it matter? Pediatric Clinics of North America, 50(2), pp. 381-97.
Lalakea ML, Messner AH. Ankyloglossia: Does It Matter. Pediatr Clin North Am. 2003;50(2):381-97. PubMed PMID: 12809329.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ankyloglossia: does it matter? AU - Lalakea,M Lauren, AU - Messner,Anna H, PY - 2003/6/18/pubmed PY - 2003/7/9/medline PY - 2003/6/18/entrez SP - 381 EP - 97 JF - Pediatric clinics of North America JO - Pediatr. Clin. North Am. VL - 50 IS - 2 N2 - Ankyloglossia is an uncommon oral anomaly that can cause difficulty with breast-feeding, speech articulation, and mechanical tasks such as licking the lips and kissing. For many years the subject of ankyloglossia has been controversial, with practitioners of many specialties having widely different views regarding its significance. In many children, ankyloglossia is asymptomatic; the condition may resolve spontaneously, or affected children may learn to compensate adequately for their decreased lingual mobility. Some children, however, benefit from surgical intervention (frenotomy or frenuloplasty) for their tongue-tie. Parents should be educated about the possible long-term effects of tongue-tie while their child is young (< 1 year of age), so that they may make an informed choice regarding possible therapy. SN - 0031-3955 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12809329/Ankyloglossia:_does_it_matter L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0031-3955(03)00029-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -