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Dietary calcium and vitamin D intake in relation to osteoporotic fracture risk.
Bone 2003; 32(6):694-703BONE

Abstract

The etiologic role of dietary calcium and vitamin D intake in primary prevention of osteoporotic fractures is uncertain, despite considerable research efforts. With the aim to examine these associations with an improved precision, we used data from a large population-based prospective cohort study in central Sweden. We estimated nutrient intake from a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire filled in by 60,689 women, aged 40-74 years at baseline during 1987-1990. During follow-up, we observed 3986 women with a fracture at any site and 1535 with a hip fracture. Rate ratio of fractures (RR) and 95% CI were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. We found no dose-response association between dietary calcium intake and fracture risk. The age-adjusted RR of hip fracture was 1.01 (95% CI 0.96-1.06) per 300 mg calcium/day and the corresponding risk of any osteoporotic fracture was 0.99 (95% CI 0.96-1.03). Furthermore, women with an estimated calcium intake below 400 mg/day and those with a calcium intake higher than 1200 mg/day both had a similar age-adjusted hip fracture risk as those with intermediate calcium intakes: RR 1.07 (95% CI 0.92-1.24) and RR 1.00 (95% CI 0.79-1.27), respectively. Vitamin D intake was not associated with fracture risk. Furthermore, women in the highest quintiles compared to the lowest quintiles of both calcium and vitamin D intake had an age-adjusted RR of 1.02 for all fractures (95% CI 0.88-1.17). Dietary calcium or vitamin D intakes estimated at middle and older age do not seem to be of major importance for the primary prevention of osteoporotic fractures in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics, University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. Karl.Michaelsson@ortopedi.uu.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12810177

Citation

Michaëlsson, Karl, et al. "Dietary Calcium and Vitamin D Intake in Relation to Osteoporotic Fracture Risk." Bone, vol. 32, no. 6, 2003, pp. 694-703.
Michaëlsson K, Melhus H, Bellocco R, et al. Dietary calcium and vitamin D intake in relation to osteoporotic fracture risk. Bone. 2003;32(6):694-703.
Michaëlsson, K., Melhus, H., Bellocco, R., & Wolk, A. (2003). Dietary calcium and vitamin D intake in relation to osteoporotic fracture risk. Bone, 32(6), pp. 694-703.
Michaëlsson K, et al. Dietary Calcium and Vitamin D Intake in Relation to Osteoporotic Fracture Risk. Bone. 2003;32(6):694-703. PubMed PMID: 12810177.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary calcium and vitamin D intake in relation to osteoporotic fracture risk. AU - Michaëlsson,Karl, AU - Melhus,Håkan, AU - Bellocco,Rino, AU - Wolk,Alicja, PY - 2003/6/18/pubmed PY - 2004/2/28/medline PY - 2003/6/18/entrez SP - 694 EP - 703 JF - Bone JO - Bone VL - 32 IS - 6 N2 - The etiologic role of dietary calcium and vitamin D intake in primary prevention of osteoporotic fractures is uncertain, despite considerable research efforts. With the aim to examine these associations with an improved precision, we used data from a large population-based prospective cohort study in central Sweden. We estimated nutrient intake from a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire filled in by 60,689 women, aged 40-74 years at baseline during 1987-1990. During follow-up, we observed 3986 women with a fracture at any site and 1535 with a hip fracture. Rate ratio of fractures (RR) and 95% CI were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. We found no dose-response association between dietary calcium intake and fracture risk. The age-adjusted RR of hip fracture was 1.01 (95% CI 0.96-1.06) per 300 mg calcium/day and the corresponding risk of any osteoporotic fracture was 0.99 (95% CI 0.96-1.03). Furthermore, women with an estimated calcium intake below 400 mg/day and those with a calcium intake higher than 1200 mg/day both had a similar age-adjusted hip fracture risk as those with intermediate calcium intakes: RR 1.07 (95% CI 0.92-1.24) and RR 1.00 (95% CI 0.79-1.27), respectively. Vitamin D intake was not associated with fracture risk. Furthermore, women in the highest quintiles compared to the lowest quintiles of both calcium and vitamin D intake had an age-adjusted RR of 1.02 for all fractures (95% CI 0.88-1.17). Dietary calcium or vitamin D intakes estimated at middle and older age do not seem to be of major importance for the primary prevention of osteoporotic fractures in women. SN - 8756-3282 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12810177/Dietary_calcium_and_vitamin_D_intake_in_relation_to_osteoporotic_fracture_risk_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S8756328203000486 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -