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Vendor-to-vendor education to improve malaria treatment by private drug outlets in Bungoma District, Kenya.
Malar J. 2003 May 07; 2:10.MJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Private outlets are the main suppliers of uncomplicated malaria treatment in Africa. However, they are so numerous that they are difficult for governments to influence and regulate. This study's objective was to evaluate a low-cost outreach education (vendor-to-vendor) programme to improve the private sector's compliance with malaria guidelines in Bungoma district, Kenya. The cornerstone of the programme was the district's training of 73 wholesalers who were equipped with customized job aids for distribution to small retailers.

METHODS

Six months after training the wholesalers, the programme was evaluated using mystery shoppers. The shoppers posed as caretakers of sick children needing medication at 252 drug outlets. Afterwards, supervisors assessed the outlets' knowledge, drug stocks, and prices.

RESULTS

The intervention seems to have had a significant impact on stocking patterns, malaria knowledge and prescribing practices of shops/kiosks, but not consistently on other types of outlets. About 32% of shops receiving job aids prescribed to mystery shoppers the approved first-line drug, sulfadoxine-pyremethamine, as compared to only 3% of the control shops. In the first six months, it is estimated that 500 outlets were reached, at a cost of about $8000.

CONCLUSIONS

Changing private sector knowledge and practices is widely acknowledged to be slow and difficult. The vendor-to-vendor programme seems a feasible district-level strategy for achieving significant improvements in knowledge and practices of shops/kiosks. However, alternate strategies will be needed to influence pharmacies and clinics. Overall, the impact will be only moderate unless national policies and programmes are also introduced.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA. ptavrow@ucla.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12812525

Citation

Tavrow, Paula, et al. "Vendor-to-vendor Education to Improve Malaria Treatment By Private Drug Outlets in Bungoma District, Kenya." Malaria Journal, vol. 2, 2003, p. 10.
Tavrow P, Shabahang J, Makama S. Vendor-to-vendor education to improve malaria treatment by private drug outlets in Bungoma District, Kenya. Malar J. 2003;2:10.
Tavrow, P., Shabahang, J., & Makama, S. (2003). Vendor-to-vendor education to improve malaria treatment by private drug outlets in Bungoma District, Kenya. Malaria Journal, 2, 10.
Tavrow P, Shabahang J, Makama S. Vendor-to-vendor Education to Improve Malaria Treatment By Private Drug Outlets in Bungoma District, Kenya. Malar J. 2003 May 7;2:10. PubMed PMID: 12812525.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vendor-to-vendor education to improve malaria treatment by private drug outlets in Bungoma District, Kenya. AU - Tavrow,Paula, AU - Shabahang,Jennifer, AU - Makama,Sammy, Y1 - 2003/05/07/ PY - 2002/12/13/received PY - 2003/05/07/accepted PY - 2003/6/19/pubmed PY - 2003/12/4/medline PY - 2003/6/19/entrez SP - 10 EP - 10 JF - Malaria journal JO - Malar J VL - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Private outlets are the main suppliers of uncomplicated malaria treatment in Africa. However, they are so numerous that they are difficult for governments to influence and regulate. This study's objective was to evaluate a low-cost outreach education (vendor-to-vendor) programme to improve the private sector's compliance with malaria guidelines in Bungoma district, Kenya. The cornerstone of the programme was the district's training of 73 wholesalers who were equipped with customized job aids for distribution to small retailers. METHODS: Six months after training the wholesalers, the programme was evaluated using mystery shoppers. The shoppers posed as caretakers of sick children needing medication at 252 drug outlets. Afterwards, supervisors assessed the outlets' knowledge, drug stocks, and prices. RESULTS: The intervention seems to have had a significant impact on stocking patterns, malaria knowledge and prescribing practices of shops/kiosks, but not consistently on other types of outlets. About 32% of shops receiving job aids prescribed to mystery shoppers the approved first-line drug, sulfadoxine-pyremethamine, as compared to only 3% of the control shops. In the first six months, it is estimated that 500 outlets were reached, at a cost of about $8000. CONCLUSIONS: Changing private sector knowledge and practices is widely acknowledged to be slow and difficult. The vendor-to-vendor programme seems a feasible district-level strategy for achieving significant improvements in knowledge and practices of shops/kiosks. However, alternate strategies will be needed to influence pharmacies and clinics. Overall, the impact will be only moderate unless national policies and programmes are also introduced. SN - 1475-2875 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12812525/Vendor_to_vendor_education_to_improve_malaria_treatment_by_private_drug_outlets_in_Bungoma_District_Kenya_ L2 - https://malariajournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2875-2-10 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -