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Efficacy and tolerability of low-dose iron supplements during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial.
Am J Clin Nutr 2003; 78(1):145-53AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is common in pregnant women, but previous trials aimed at preventing IDA used high-dose iron supplements that are known to cause gastrointestinal side effects.

OBJECTIVE

The objective was to assess the effect on maternal IDA and iron deficiency (ID, without anemia) of supplementing pregnant women with a low dosage (20 mg/d) of iron. Effects on iron status were assessed at the time of delivery and at 6 mo postpartum. Gastrointestinal side effects were assessed at 24 and 36 wk of gestation.

DESIGN

This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a 20-mg daily iron supplement (ferrous sulfate) given from 20 wk of gestation until delivery.

RESULTS

A total of 430 women were enrolled, and 386 (89.7%) completed the follow-up to 6 mo postpartum. At delivery, fewer women from the iron-supplemented group than from the placebo group had IDA [6/198, or 3%, compared with 20/185, or 11%; relative risk (RR): 0.28; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.68; P < 0.005], and fewer women from the iron-supplemented group had ID (65/186, or 35%, compared with 102/176, or 58%; RR: 0.60; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.76; P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in gastrointestinal side effects between groups. At 6 mo postpartum, fewer women from the iron-supplemented group had ID (31/190, or 16%, compared with 51/177, or 29%; RR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.38, 0.84; P < 0.005). The rate of IDA between the groups did not differ significantly at 6 mo postpartum.

CONCLUSION

Supplementing the diet of women with 20 mg Fe/d from week 20 of pregnancy until delivery is an effective strategy for preventing IDA and ID without side effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Child Nutrition Research Centre, Child Health Research Institute, and Department of Paediatrics, University of Adelaide, Women's & Children's Hospital, North Adelaide, SA, Australia. makridesm@mail.wch.sa.gov.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12816784

Citation

Makrides, Maria, et al. "Efficacy and Tolerability of Low-dose Iron Supplements During Pregnancy: a Randomized Controlled Trial." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 78, no. 1, 2003, pp. 145-53.
Makrides M, Crowther CA, Gibson RA, et al. Efficacy and tolerability of low-dose iron supplements during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;78(1):145-53.
Makrides, M., Crowther, C. A., Gibson, R. A., Gibson, R. S., & Skeaff, C. M. (2003). Efficacy and tolerability of low-dose iron supplements during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 78(1), pp. 145-53.
Makrides M, et al. Efficacy and Tolerability of Low-dose Iron Supplements During Pregnancy: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2003;78(1):145-53. PubMed PMID: 12816784.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Efficacy and tolerability of low-dose iron supplements during pregnancy: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Makrides,Maria, AU - Crowther,Caroline A, AU - Gibson,Robert A, AU - Gibson,Rosalind S, AU - Skeaff,C Murray, PY - 2003/6/21/pubmed PY - 2003/7/9/medline PY - 2003/6/21/entrez SP - 145 EP - 53 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 78 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is common in pregnant women, but previous trials aimed at preventing IDA used high-dose iron supplements that are known to cause gastrointestinal side effects. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to assess the effect on maternal IDA and iron deficiency (ID, without anemia) of supplementing pregnant women with a low dosage (20 mg/d) of iron. Effects on iron status were assessed at the time of delivery and at 6 mo postpartum. Gastrointestinal side effects were assessed at 24 and 36 wk of gestation. DESIGN: This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a 20-mg daily iron supplement (ferrous sulfate) given from 20 wk of gestation until delivery. RESULTS: A total of 430 women were enrolled, and 386 (89.7%) completed the follow-up to 6 mo postpartum. At delivery, fewer women from the iron-supplemented group than from the placebo group had IDA [6/198, or 3%, compared with 20/185, or 11%; relative risk (RR): 0.28; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.68; P < 0.005], and fewer women from the iron-supplemented group had ID (65/186, or 35%, compared with 102/176, or 58%; RR: 0.60; 95% CI: 0.48, 0.76; P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in gastrointestinal side effects between groups. At 6 mo postpartum, fewer women from the iron-supplemented group had ID (31/190, or 16%, compared with 51/177, or 29%; RR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.38, 0.84; P < 0.005). The rate of IDA between the groups did not differ significantly at 6 mo postpartum. CONCLUSION: Supplementing the diet of women with 20 mg Fe/d from week 20 of pregnancy until delivery is an effective strategy for preventing IDA and ID without side effects. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12816784/Efficacy_and_tolerability_of_low_dose_iron_supplements_during_pregnancy:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/78.1.145 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -