Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Brain responses to visceral and somatic stimuli in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with and without fibromyalgia.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2003 Jun; 98(6):1354-61.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and fibromyalgia (FM) commonly coexist. We hypothesized that one of the mechanisms underlying this comorbidity is increased activation of brain regions concerned with the processing and modulation of visceral and somatic afferent information, in particular subregions of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC).

METHODS

Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was assessed in age-matched female IBS (n = 10) and IBS + FM (n = 10) subjects using H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography during noxious visceral (rectal) and somatic pressure stimuli.

RESULTS

GI symptom severity was significantly higher in the IBS patients compared with the IBS + FM patients (p < 0.05). In addition, IBS + FM patients rated somatic pain as more intense than their abdominal pain (p < 0.05). Whereas the somatic stimulus was less unpleasant than the visceral stimulus for IBS patients without FM, the somatic and visceral stimuli were equally unpleasant in the IBS + FM group. Group differences in regional brain activation were entirely within the middle subregion of the ACC. There was a greater rCBF increase in response to noxious visceral stimuli in IBS patients and to somatic stimuli in IBS + FM patients.

CONCLUSION

Chronic stimulus-specific enhancement of ACC responses to sensory stimuli in both syndromes may be associated with cognitive enhancement of either visceral (IBS) or somatic (IBS + FM) sensory input and may play a key pathophysiologic role in these chronic pain syndromes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

C.N.S. Center for Neurovisceral Sciences & Women's Health, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12818281

Citation

Chang, Lin, et al. "Brain Responses to Visceral and Somatic Stimuli in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome With and Without Fibromyalgia." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 98, no. 6, 2003, pp. 1354-61.
Chang L, Berman S, Mayer EA, et al. Brain responses to visceral and somatic stimuli in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with and without fibromyalgia. Am J Gastroenterol. 2003;98(6):1354-61.
Chang, L., Berman, S., Mayer, E. A., Suyenobu, B., Derbyshire, S., Naliboff, B., Vogt, B., FitzGerald, L., & Mandelkern, M. A. (2003). Brain responses to visceral and somatic stimuli in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with and without fibromyalgia. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 98(6), 1354-61.
Chang L, et al. Brain Responses to Visceral and Somatic Stimuli in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome With and Without Fibromyalgia. Am J Gastroenterol. 2003;98(6):1354-61. PubMed PMID: 12818281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Brain responses to visceral and somatic stimuli in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with and without fibromyalgia. AU - Chang,Lin, AU - Berman,Steve, AU - Mayer,Emeran A, AU - Suyenobu,Brandall, AU - Derbyshire,Stuart, AU - Naliboff,Bruce, AU - Vogt,Brent, AU - FitzGerald,Leah, AU - Mandelkern,Mark A, PY - 2003/6/24/pubmed PY - 2003/8/6/medline PY - 2003/6/24/entrez SP - 1354 EP - 61 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 98 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and fibromyalgia (FM) commonly coexist. We hypothesized that one of the mechanisms underlying this comorbidity is increased activation of brain regions concerned with the processing and modulation of visceral and somatic afferent information, in particular subregions of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). METHODS: Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was assessed in age-matched female IBS (n = 10) and IBS + FM (n = 10) subjects using H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography during noxious visceral (rectal) and somatic pressure stimuli. RESULTS: GI symptom severity was significantly higher in the IBS patients compared with the IBS + FM patients (p < 0.05). In addition, IBS + FM patients rated somatic pain as more intense than their abdominal pain (p < 0.05). Whereas the somatic stimulus was less unpleasant than the visceral stimulus for IBS patients without FM, the somatic and visceral stimuli were equally unpleasant in the IBS + FM group. Group differences in regional brain activation were entirely within the middle subregion of the ACC. There was a greater rCBF increase in response to noxious visceral stimuli in IBS patients and to somatic stimuli in IBS + FM patients. CONCLUSION: Chronic stimulus-specific enhancement of ACC responses to sensory stimuli in both syndromes may be associated with cognitive enhancement of either visceral (IBS) or somatic (IBS + FM) sensory input and may play a key pathophysiologic role in these chronic pain syndromes. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12818281/Brain_responses_to_visceral_and_somatic_stimuli_in_patients_with_irritable_bowel_syndrome_with_and_without_fibromyalgia_ L2 - https://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=12818281 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -