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Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and survival in a Greek population.
N Engl J Med. 2003 Jun 26; 348(26):2599-608.NEJM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Adherence to a Mediterranean diet may improve longevity, but relevant data are limited.

METHODS

We conducted a population-based, prospective investigation involving 22,043 adults in Greece who completed an extensive, validated, food-frequency questionnaire at base line. Adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet was assessed by a 10-point Mediterranean-diet scale that incorporated the salient characteristics of this diet (range of scores, 0 to 9, with higher scores indicating greater adherence). We used proportional-hazards regression to assess the relation between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and total mortality, as well as mortality due to coronary heart disease and mortality due to cancer, with adjustment for age, sex, body-mass index, physical-activity level, and other potential confounders.

RESULTS

During a median of 44 months of follow-up, there were 275 deaths. A higher degree of adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with a reduction in total mortality (adjusted hazard ratio for death associated with a two-point increment in the Mediterranean-diet score, 0.75 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.64 to 0.87]). An inverse association with greater adherence to this diet was evident for both death due to coronary heart disease (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.67 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.47 to 0.94]) and death due to cancer (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.76 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.59 to 0.98]). Associations between individual food groups contributing to the Mediterranean-diet score and total mortality were generally not significant.

CONCLUSIONS

Greater adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet is associated with a significant reduction in total mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. antonia@nut.uoa.grNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12826634

Citation

Trichopoulou, Antonia, et al. "Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet and Survival in a Greek Population." The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 348, no. 26, 2003, pp. 2599-608.
Trichopoulou A, Costacou T, Bamia C, et al. Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and survival in a Greek population. N Engl J Med. 2003;348(26):2599-608.
Trichopoulou, A., Costacou, T., Bamia, C., & Trichopoulos, D. (2003). Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and survival in a Greek population. The New England Journal of Medicine, 348(26), 2599-608.
Trichopoulou A, et al. Adherence to a Mediterranean Diet and Survival in a Greek Population. N Engl J Med. 2003 Jun 26;348(26):2599-608. PubMed PMID: 12826634.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and survival in a Greek population. AU - Trichopoulou,Antonia, AU - Costacou,Tina, AU - Bamia,Christina, AU - Trichopoulos,Dimitrios, PY - 2003/6/27/pubmed PY - 2003/7/9/medline PY - 2003/6/27/entrez SP - 2599 EP - 608 JF - The New England journal of medicine JO - N Engl J Med VL - 348 IS - 26 N2 - BACKGROUND: Adherence to a Mediterranean diet may improve longevity, but relevant data are limited. METHODS: We conducted a population-based, prospective investigation involving 22,043 adults in Greece who completed an extensive, validated, food-frequency questionnaire at base line. Adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet was assessed by a 10-point Mediterranean-diet scale that incorporated the salient characteristics of this diet (range of scores, 0 to 9, with higher scores indicating greater adherence). We used proportional-hazards regression to assess the relation between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and total mortality, as well as mortality due to coronary heart disease and mortality due to cancer, with adjustment for age, sex, body-mass index, physical-activity level, and other potential confounders. RESULTS: During a median of 44 months of follow-up, there were 275 deaths. A higher degree of adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with a reduction in total mortality (adjusted hazard ratio for death associated with a two-point increment in the Mediterranean-diet score, 0.75 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.64 to 0.87]). An inverse association with greater adherence to this diet was evident for both death due to coronary heart disease (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.67 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.47 to 0.94]) and death due to cancer (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.76 [95 percent confidence interval, 0.59 to 0.98]). Associations between individual food groups contributing to the Mediterranean-diet score and total mortality were generally not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Greater adherence to the traditional Mediterranean diet is associated with a significant reduction in total mortality. SN - 1533-4406 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12826634/Adherence_to_a_Mediterranean_diet_and_survival_in_a_Greek_population_ L2 - https://www.nejm.org/doi/10.1056/NEJMoa025039?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -