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Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae: are they useful in clinical practice?
Hepatogastroenterology 2003 May-Jun; 50(51):718-20H

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS

Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae are associated with Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Crohn's disease in an Italian population and to evaluate their clinical role.

METHODOLOGY

Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae serum levels were assessed in 72 inflammatory bowel disease patients (30 Crohn's disease; 42 ulcerative colitis) and 35 age-matched controls. Patients were divided into subgroups on the basis of disease behavior and clinical feature were evaluated.

RESULTS

Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae sensitivity and specificity for Crohn's disease patients were 50% (31-68) and 91% (77-98), for IgG and 56% (37-64) and 94% (80-99), respectively, for IgA. No correlation was observed between the presence of antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and clinical features. Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae were more prevalent in Crohn's disease than in ulcerative colitis patients (IgA: 57% vs. 26%; IgG: 50% vs. 17%; p < 0.05). Interestingly, in Crohn's disease patients, the prevalence of antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae was higher in patients with small bowel involvement than in patients with pure colonic disease (IgA: 66% vs. 17%; IgG: 58% vs. 17%). No difference in antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae prevalence was observed between ulcerative colitis and pure colonic Crohn's disease patients.

CONCLUSIONS

Our data show an association between Crohn's disease and antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, it does not seem useful in discriminating between ulcerative colitis and colic Crohn's disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12828069

Citation

Candelli, M, et al. "Antibodies to Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: Are They Useful in Clinical Practice?" Hepato-gastroenterology, vol. 50, no. 51, 2003, pp. 718-20.
Candelli M, Papa A, Nista EC, et al. Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae: are they useful in clinical practice? Hepatogastroenterology. 2003;50(51):718-20.
Candelli, M., Papa, A., Nista, E. C., Danese, S., Armuzzi, A., Bartolozzi, F., ... Gasbarrini, A. (2003). Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae: are they useful in clinical practice? Hepato-gastroenterology, 50(51), pp. 718-20.
Candelli M, et al. Antibodies to Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: Are They Useful in Clinical Practice. Hepatogastroenterology. 2003;50(51):718-20. PubMed PMID: 12828069.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae: are they useful in clinical practice? AU - Candelli,M, AU - Papa,A, AU - Nista,E C, AU - Danese,S, AU - Armuzzi,A, AU - Bartolozzi,F, AU - Tondi,P, AU - Ojetti,V, AU - Gasbarrini,G, AU - Gasbarrini,A, PY - 2003/6/28/pubmed PY - 2003/10/24/medline PY - 2003/6/28/entrez SP - 718 EP - 20 JF - Hepato-gastroenterology JO - Hepatogastroenterology VL - 50 IS - 51 N2 - BACKGROUND/AIMS: Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae are associated with Crohn's disease. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity and specificity of antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Crohn's disease in an Italian population and to evaluate their clinical role. METHODOLOGY: Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae serum levels were assessed in 72 inflammatory bowel disease patients (30 Crohn's disease; 42 ulcerative colitis) and 35 age-matched controls. Patients were divided into subgroups on the basis of disease behavior and clinical feature were evaluated. RESULTS: Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae sensitivity and specificity for Crohn's disease patients were 50% (31-68) and 91% (77-98), for IgG and 56% (37-64) and 94% (80-99), respectively, for IgA. No correlation was observed between the presence of antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and clinical features. Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae were more prevalent in Crohn's disease than in ulcerative colitis patients (IgA: 57% vs. 26%; IgG: 50% vs. 17%; p < 0.05). Interestingly, in Crohn's disease patients, the prevalence of antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae was higher in patients with small bowel involvement than in patients with pure colonic disease (IgA: 66% vs. 17%; IgG: 58% vs. 17%). No difference in antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae prevalence was observed between ulcerative colitis and pure colonic Crohn's disease patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show an association between Crohn's disease and antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, it does not seem useful in discriminating between ulcerative colitis and colic Crohn's disease. SN - 0172-6390 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12828069/Antibodies_to_Saccharomyces_cerevisiae:_are_they_useful_in_clinical_practice L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/crohnsdisease.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -