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Plasma concentration of C-reactive protein and the calculated Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score.
Circulation. 2003 Jul 15; 108(2):161-5.Circ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although C-reactive protein (CRP) predicts vascular risk, few data are available evaluating the relation between CRP and the Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score (FCRS).

METHODS AND RESULTS

CRP levels were compared with calculated 10-year FCRS in a cross-sectional survey of 1666 individuals free of cardiovascular disease. Among men and women not using hormone replacement therapy (HRT), CRP levels were significantly related to 10-year Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk categories [total cholesterol (TC) score for men and women: r=0.29 and r=0.22, respectively; LDL cholesterol score for men and women: r=0.29 and r=0.22, respectively, all probability values <0.01]. However, CRP levels correlated minimally with individual components of the FCRS, which included age (r(men)=0.17, r(women)=-0.003), TC (r(men)=-0.02, r(women)=-0.006), HDL-C (r(men)=0.13), LDL-C (r(men)=-0.0002, r(women)=0.012), blood pressure (rmen=0.18, r(women)=0.22), diabetes (r(men)=0.10, r(women)=0.07), and smoking (r(men)=0.16, r(women)=0.14) status. For women taking HRT, no significant relation was observed between CRP and the FCRS, although the power to detect effects in this subgroup is limited.

CONCLUSIONS

Our data demonstrate that CRP levels significantly correlate with calculated 10-year Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk in men and women not taking HRT but correlate minimally with most individual components of the FCRS. These data provide additional support for continued evaluation of CRP as a potential adjunct in the global prediction of cardiovascular risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention, Division Cardiovascular Diseases, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass 02115, USA. maalbert@partners.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12835213

Citation

Albert, Michelle A., et al. "Plasma Concentration of C-reactive Protein and the Calculated Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score." Circulation, vol. 108, no. 2, 2003, pp. 161-5.
Albert MA, Glynn RJ, Ridker PM. Plasma concentration of C-reactive protein and the calculated Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score. Circulation. 2003;108(2):161-5.
Albert, M. A., Glynn, R. J., & Ridker, P. M. (2003). Plasma concentration of C-reactive protein and the calculated Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score. Circulation, 108(2), 161-5.
Albert MA, Glynn RJ, Ridker PM. Plasma Concentration of C-reactive Protein and the Calculated Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score. Circulation. 2003 Jul 15;108(2):161-5. PubMed PMID: 12835213.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plasma concentration of C-reactive protein and the calculated Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score. AU - Albert,Michelle A, AU - Glynn,Robert J, AU - Ridker,Paul M, Y1 - 2003/06/30/ PY - 2003/7/2/pubmed PY - 2003/8/6/medline PY - 2003/7/2/entrez SP - 161 EP - 5 JF - Circulation JO - Circulation VL - 108 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although C-reactive protein (CRP) predicts vascular risk, few data are available evaluating the relation between CRP and the Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk Score (FCRS). METHODS AND RESULTS: CRP levels were compared with calculated 10-year FCRS in a cross-sectional survey of 1666 individuals free of cardiovascular disease. Among men and women not using hormone replacement therapy (HRT), CRP levels were significantly related to 10-year Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk categories [total cholesterol (TC) score for men and women: r=0.29 and r=0.22, respectively; LDL cholesterol score for men and women: r=0.29 and r=0.22, respectively, all probability values <0.01]. However, CRP levels correlated minimally with individual components of the FCRS, which included age (r(men)=0.17, r(women)=-0.003), TC (r(men)=-0.02, r(women)=-0.006), HDL-C (r(men)=0.13), LDL-C (r(men)=-0.0002, r(women)=0.012), blood pressure (rmen=0.18, r(women)=0.22), diabetes (r(men)=0.10, r(women)=0.07), and smoking (r(men)=0.16, r(women)=0.14) status. For women taking HRT, no significant relation was observed between CRP and the FCRS, although the power to detect effects in this subgroup is limited. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that CRP levels significantly correlate with calculated 10-year Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk in men and women not taking HRT but correlate minimally with most individual components of the FCRS. These data provide additional support for continued evaluation of CRP as a potential adjunct in the global prediction of cardiovascular risk. SN - 1524-4539 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12835213/Plasma_concentration_of_C_reactive_protein_and_the_calculated_Framingham_Coronary_Heart_Disease_Risk_Score_ L2 - https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/01.CIR.0000080289.72166.CF?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -