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Plant and marine derived (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids do not affect blood coagulation and fibrinolytic factors in moderately hyperlipidemic humans.
J Nutr. 2003 Jul; 133(7):2210-3.JN

Abstract

Dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) can be converted to long-chain (n-3) PUFA in humans and may potentially reproduce the beneficial effects of eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids on risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). This study compared the effects of increased intakes of ALA with those of dietary EPA and DHA on blood coagulation and fibrinolytic factors in fasting subjects. A placebo-controlled, parallel study was conducted in 150 moderately hyperlipidemic subjects, age 25-72 y. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of five interventions and consumed a total intake of 0.8 or 1.7g/d EPA+DHA, 4.5 or 9.5g/d ALA or control (linoleic acid; LA) for 6 mo. Fatty acids were incorporated into 25 g of fat spread, which replaced the subject's normal spread and three capsules. Long-term supplementation with either dietary EPA+DHA or estimated biologically equivalent amounts of ALA did not affect factors VIIa, VIIc, VIIag, XIIa, XIIag, fibrinogen concentrations, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 or tissue plasminogen activator activity compared with the control. (n-3) PUFA of plant or marine origin do not differ from one another or from LA in their effect on a range of blood coagulation and fibrinolytic factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hugh Sinclair Unit of Human Nutrition, University of Reading, Reading, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12840180

Citation

Finnegan, Yvonne E., et al. "Plant and Marine Derived (n-3) Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Do Not Affect Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolytic Factors in Moderately Hyperlipidemic Humans." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 133, no. 7, 2003, pp. 2210-3.
Finnegan YE, Howarth D, Minihane AM, et al. Plant and marine derived (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids do not affect blood coagulation and fibrinolytic factors in moderately hyperlipidemic humans. J Nutr. 2003;133(7):2210-3.
Finnegan, Y. E., Howarth, D., Minihane, A. M., Kew, S., Miller, G. J., Calder, P. C., & Williams, C. M. (2003). Plant and marine derived (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids do not affect blood coagulation and fibrinolytic factors in moderately hyperlipidemic humans. The Journal of Nutrition, 133(7), 2210-3.
Finnegan YE, et al. Plant and Marine Derived (n-3) Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Do Not Affect Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolytic Factors in Moderately Hyperlipidemic Humans. J Nutr. 2003;133(7):2210-3. PubMed PMID: 12840180.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Plant and marine derived (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids do not affect blood coagulation and fibrinolytic factors in moderately hyperlipidemic humans. AU - Finnegan,Yvonne E, AU - Howarth,David, AU - Minihane,Anne M, AU - Kew,Samantha, AU - Miller,George J, AU - Calder,Philip C, AU - Williams,Christine M, PY - 2003/7/4/pubmed PY - 2003/8/26/medline PY - 2003/7/4/entrez SP - 2210 EP - 3 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 133 IS - 7 N2 - Dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) can be converted to long-chain (n-3) PUFA in humans and may potentially reproduce the beneficial effects of eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids on risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). This study compared the effects of increased intakes of ALA with those of dietary EPA and DHA on blood coagulation and fibrinolytic factors in fasting subjects. A placebo-controlled, parallel study was conducted in 150 moderately hyperlipidemic subjects, age 25-72 y. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of five interventions and consumed a total intake of 0.8 or 1.7g/d EPA+DHA, 4.5 or 9.5g/d ALA or control (linoleic acid; LA) for 6 mo. Fatty acids were incorporated into 25 g of fat spread, which replaced the subject's normal spread and three capsules. Long-term supplementation with either dietary EPA+DHA or estimated biologically equivalent amounts of ALA did not affect factors VIIa, VIIc, VIIag, XIIa, XIIag, fibrinogen concentrations, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 or tissue plasminogen activator activity compared with the control. (n-3) PUFA of plant or marine origin do not differ from one another or from LA in their effect on a range of blood coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12840180/Plant_and_marine_derived__n_3__polyunsaturated_fatty_acids_do_not_affect_blood_coagulation_and_fibrinolytic_factors_in_moderately_hyperlipidemic_humans_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/133.7.2210 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -