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Dietary intakes and food sources of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.
Lipids. 2003 Apr; 38(4):391-8.L

Abstract

Both n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are recognized as essential nutrients in the human diet, yet reliable data on population intakes are limited. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the dietary intakes and food sources of individual n-6 and n-3 PUFA in the Australian population. An existing database with fatty acid composition data on 1690 foods was updated with newly validated data on 150 foods to estimate the fatty acid content of foods recorded as eaten by 10,851 adults in the 1995 Australian National Nutrition Survey. Average daily intakes of linoleic (LA), arachidonic (AA), alpha-linolenic (LNA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), docosapentaenoic (DPA), and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids were 10.8, 0.052, 1.17, 0.056, 0.026, and 0.106 g, respectively, with long-chain (LC) n-3 PUFA (addition of EPA, DPA, and DHA) totaling 0.189 g; median intakes were considerably lower (9.0 g LA, 0.024 g AA, 0.95 g LNA, 0.008 g EPA, 0.006 g DPA, 0.015 g DHA, and 0.029 g LC n-3 PUFA). Fats and oils, meat and poultry, cereal-based products and cereals, vegetables, and nuts and seeds were important sources of n-6 PUFA, while cereal-based products, fats and oils, meat and poultry, cereals, milk products, and vegetable products were sources of LNA. As expected, seafood was the main source of LC n-3 PUFA, contributing 71%, while meat and eggs contributed 20 and 6%, respectively. The results indicate that the majority of Australians are failing to meet intake recommendations for LC n-3 PUFA (> 0.2 g per day) and emphasize the need for strategies to increase the availability and consumption of n-3-containing foods.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biomedical Science & Smart Foods Centre, University of Wollongong, Wollongong NSW 2522, Australia. barbara_meyer@uow.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12848284

Citation

Meyer, Barbara J., et al. "Dietary Intakes and Food Sources of Omega-6 and Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids." Lipids, vol. 38, no. 4, 2003, pp. 391-8.
Meyer BJ, Mann NJ, Lewis JL, et al. Dietary intakes and food sources of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Lipids. 2003;38(4):391-8.
Meyer, B. J., Mann, N. J., Lewis, J. L., Milligan, G. C., Sinclair, A. J., & Howe, P. R. (2003). Dietary intakes and food sources of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Lipids, 38(4), 391-8.
Meyer BJ, et al. Dietary Intakes and Food Sources of Omega-6 and Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids. Lipids. 2003;38(4):391-8. PubMed PMID: 12848284.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary intakes and food sources of omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. AU - Meyer,Barbara J, AU - Mann,Neil J, AU - Lewis,Janine L, AU - Milligan,Greg C, AU - Sinclair,Andrew J, AU - Howe,Peter R C, PY - 2003/7/10/pubmed PY - 2004/4/3/medline PY - 2003/7/10/entrez SP - 391 EP - 8 JF - Lipids JO - Lipids VL - 38 IS - 4 N2 - Both n-6 and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are recognized as essential nutrients in the human diet, yet reliable data on population intakes are limited. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the dietary intakes and food sources of individual n-6 and n-3 PUFA in the Australian population. An existing database with fatty acid composition data on 1690 foods was updated with newly validated data on 150 foods to estimate the fatty acid content of foods recorded as eaten by 10,851 adults in the 1995 Australian National Nutrition Survey. Average daily intakes of linoleic (LA), arachidonic (AA), alpha-linolenic (LNA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), docosapentaenoic (DPA), and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids were 10.8, 0.052, 1.17, 0.056, 0.026, and 0.106 g, respectively, with long-chain (LC) n-3 PUFA (addition of EPA, DPA, and DHA) totaling 0.189 g; median intakes were considerably lower (9.0 g LA, 0.024 g AA, 0.95 g LNA, 0.008 g EPA, 0.006 g DPA, 0.015 g DHA, and 0.029 g LC n-3 PUFA). Fats and oils, meat and poultry, cereal-based products and cereals, vegetables, and nuts and seeds were important sources of n-6 PUFA, while cereal-based products, fats and oils, meat and poultry, cereals, milk products, and vegetable products were sources of LNA. As expected, seafood was the main source of LC n-3 PUFA, contributing 71%, while meat and eggs contributed 20 and 6%, respectively. The results indicate that the majority of Australians are failing to meet intake recommendations for LC n-3 PUFA (> 0.2 g per day) and emphasize the need for strategies to increase the availability and consumption of n-3-containing foods. SN - 0024-4201 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12848284/Dietary_intakes_and_food_sources_of_omega_6_and_omega_3_polyunsaturated_fatty_acids_ L2 - https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11745-003-1074-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -