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Total beverage consumption and beverage choices among children and adolescents.
Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2003 Jul; 54(4):297-307.IJ

Abstract

Patterns of beverage consumption among children and adolescents are related to age, race, and gender. The relationship between body mass index (BMI) and beverage consumption is unclear. In this paper, the total amount and the types of beverages consumed were analyzed according to age, race, and gender. Multivariate regression models were estimated for consumption of milk, juices, fruit drinks/ades, and carbonated soft drinks. Descriptive and multivariate regression analysis of children aged 6-19 from the US Department of Agriculture's Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals 1994-96, 98 was performed. It was found that age, race, and gender play a significant role in the total amount, types, and relative proportions of beverages consumed by children and adolescents. Individuals in the first decile drink approximately 212.9 g beverages per day, whereas individuals in the tenth decile drink 2036.2 g. Boys drink more of most beverages than girls do. Older teens tend to drink more carbonated beverages, fruit drinks/ades, and citrus juice, but less fluid milk and non-citrus juice. White adolescent boys are heavy consumers of most beverages, including carbonated soft drinks, milk, and fruit drinks/ades. BMI is positively associated with consumption of diet carbonated beverages and negatively associated with consumption of citrus juice. BMI was not associated with consumption of milk, regular carbonated beverages, regular or diet fruit drinks/ades, or non-citrus juices. In conclusion, total beverage consumption and beverage choices are strongly related to age, race, and gender. BMI was only related to consumption of diet carbonated beverages and milk, and those relationships were weak.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Food and Nutrition Policy, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Alexandria, VA 22314, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12850891

Citation

Forshee, Richard A., and Maureen L. Storey. "Total Beverage Consumption and Beverage Choices Among Children and Adolescents." International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, vol. 54, no. 4, 2003, pp. 297-307.
Forshee RA, Storey ML. Total beverage consumption and beverage choices among children and adolescents. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2003;54(4):297-307.
Forshee, R. A., & Storey, M. L. (2003). Total beverage consumption and beverage choices among children and adolescents. International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 54(4), 297-307.
Forshee RA, Storey ML. Total Beverage Consumption and Beverage Choices Among Children and Adolescents. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2003;54(4):297-307. PubMed PMID: 12850891.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Total beverage consumption and beverage choices among children and adolescents. AU - Forshee,Richard A, AU - Storey,Maureen L, PY - 2003/7/10/pubmed PY - 2003/10/8/medline PY - 2003/7/10/entrez SP - 297 EP - 307 JF - International journal of food sciences and nutrition JO - Int J Food Sci Nutr VL - 54 IS - 4 N2 - Patterns of beverage consumption among children and adolescents are related to age, race, and gender. The relationship between body mass index (BMI) and beverage consumption is unclear. In this paper, the total amount and the types of beverages consumed were analyzed according to age, race, and gender. Multivariate regression models were estimated for consumption of milk, juices, fruit drinks/ades, and carbonated soft drinks. Descriptive and multivariate regression analysis of children aged 6-19 from the US Department of Agriculture's Continuing Survey of Food Intake by Individuals 1994-96, 98 was performed. It was found that age, race, and gender play a significant role in the total amount, types, and relative proportions of beverages consumed by children and adolescents. Individuals in the first decile drink approximately 212.9 g beverages per day, whereas individuals in the tenth decile drink 2036.2 g. Boys drink more of most beverages than girls do. Older teens tend to drink more carbonated beverages, fruit drinks/ades, and citrus juice, but less fluid milk and non-citrus juice. White adolescent boys are heavy consumers of most beverages, including carbonated soft drinks, milk, and fruit drinks/ades. BMI is positively associated with consumption of diet carbonated beverages and negatively associated with consumption of citrus juice. BMI was not associated with consumption of milk, regular carbonated beverages, regular or diet fruit drinks/ades, or non-citrus juices. In conclusion, total beverage consumption and beverage choices are strongly related to age, race, and gender. BMI was only related to consumption of diet carbonated beverages and milk, and those relationships were weak. SN - 0963-7486 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12850891/Total_beverage_consumption_and_beverage_choices_among_children_and_adolescents_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09637480120092143 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -