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Endoscopic findings and the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in chronic renal failure patients with dyspepsia.
East Afr Med J. 2000 Aug; 77(8):406-9.EA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) occurs in up to one fourth of patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Some of the factors implicated in its causation include hypergastrinaemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs and, recently, Helicobacter pylori infection. Studies on the latter have been few, with none having been carried out in Kenya.

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopic findings and to determine the prevalence of H. pylori in CRF patients with dyspepsia. STUDY DESIGN AND POPULATION: A prospective study of seventy seven consecutive patients with CRF and dyspepsia compared with consecutive age, sex and socio-economically matched seventy seven controls (no CRF) with dyspepsia.

SETTING

Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), the major referral and teaching hospital, Nairobi, Kenya.

METHODS

In both the study population and the controls, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was carried out. H. pylori was tested for using the biopsy urease test and histology. Patients were considered to have H. pylori if they tested positive on both tests.

OUTCOME MEASURES

Findings at endoscopy and presence of H. pylori.

RESULTS

Inflammatory lesions (gastritis, duodenitis) (42%) and duodenal ulcers (18.4%) were the commonest findings in the two groups combined. The prevalence of H. pylori in the 154 subjects studied was 54.5%. There was no statistically significant difference between the prevalence of H. pylori in CRF patients (53.2%) and the controls (55.8%) (p = 0.746). Patients with endoscopically proven PUD had a very high prevalence of H. pylori (87.3%) regardless of their renal function status.

CONCLUSION

Dyspepsia in patients with or without CRF was due to multiple causes and over 50% were attributable to H. pylori. The prevalence of H. pylon in dyspeptic CRF patients was similar to that in dyspeptic patients with normal renal function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Pharmacology, College of Health Sciences, University of Nairobi, P.O. Box 19676, Nairobi.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12862061

Citation

Karari, E M., et al. "Endoscopic Findings and the Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori in Chronic Renal Failure Patients With Dyspepsia." East African Medical Journal, vol. 77, no. 8, 2000, pp. 406-9.
Karari EM, Lule GN, McLigeyo SO, et al. Endoscopic findings and the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in chronic renal failure patients with dyspepsia. East Afr Med J. 2000;77(8):406-9.
Karari, E. M., Lule, G. N., McLigeyo, S. O., & Amayo, E. O. (2000). Endoscopic findings and the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in chronic renal failure patients with dyspepsia. East African Medical Journal, 77(8), 406-9.
Karari EM, et al. Endoscopic Findings and the Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori in Chronic Renal Failure Patients With Dyspepsia. East Afr Med J. 2000;77(8):406-9. PubMed PMID: 12862061.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Endoscopic findings and the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in chronic renal failure patients with dyspepsia. AU - Karari,E M, AU - Lule,G N, AU - McLigeyo,S O, AU - Amayo,E O, PY - 2003/7/17/pubmed PY - 2003/8/14/medline PY - 2003/7/17/entrez SP - 406 EP - 9 JF - East African medical journal JO - East Afr Med J VL - 77 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) occurs in up to one fourth of patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Some of the factors implicated in its causation include hypergastrinaemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, drugs and, recently, Helicobacter pylori infection. Studies on the latter have been few, with none having been carried out in Kenya. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopic findings and to determine the prevalence of H. pylori in CRF patients with dyspepsia. STUDY DESIGN AND POPULATION: A prospective study of seventy seven consecutive patients with CRF and dyspepsia compared with consecutive age, sex and socio-economically matched seventy seven controls (no CRF) with dyspepsia. SETTING: Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH), the major referral and teaching hospital, Nairobi, Kenya. METHODS: In both the study population and the controls, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was carried out. H. pylori was tested for using the biopsy urease test and histology. Patients were considered to have H. pylori if they tested positive on both tests. OUTCOME MEASURES: Findings at endoscopy and presence of H. pylori. RESULTS: Inflammatory lesions (gastritis, duodenitis) (42%) and duodenal ulcers (18.4%) were the commonest findings in the two groups combined. The prevalence of H. pylori in the 154 subjects studied was 54.5%. There was no statistically significant difference between the prevalence of H. pylori in CRF patients (53.2%) and the controls (55.8%) (p = 0.746). Patients with endoscopically proven PUD had a very high prevalence of H. pylori (87.3%) regardless of their renal function status. CONCLUSION: Dyspepsia in patients with or without CRF was due to multiple causes and over 50% were attributable to H. pylori. The prevalence of H. pylon in dyspeptic CRF patients was similar to that in dyspeptic patients with normal renal function. SN - 0012-835X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12862061/Endoscopic_findings_and_the_prevalence_of_Helicobacter_pylori_in_chronic_renal_failure_patients_with_dyspepsia_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -