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Bacteriology of chronic maxillary sinusitis and normal maxillary sinuses: using culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction.
Am J Rhinol. 2003 May-Jun; 17(3):143-7.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although many investigations have been performed on bacteriology of chronic sinusitis and normal sinuses, there still is much discussion. Also a new bacterial agent, Alloiococcus otitidis determined in the nasopharynx and middle ear specimens can be thought as a causative agent of sinusitis.

METHODS

The bacteriology of chronic maxillary sinusitis and maxillary sinuses with normal radiogram and endoscopic findings were studied by culture methods for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to investigate four bacteria in study and control groups. There were 27 specimens in the study group and 28 specimens in the control group.

RESULTS

In the study group, the bacteria commonly isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (11.1%), alpha-hemolytic streptococci (11.1%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (11.1%), Haemophilus influenzae (7.4%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (7.4%), and anaerobes (33.3%). Coagulase-negative staphylococci (14.3%), alpha-hemolytic streptococci (10.7%), and anaerobes (35.7%) were isolated also in the control group. PCR was used to investigate S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and A. otitidis in the study and control groups. None of these bacteria was determined in the control group whereas detection rates of these bacteria in the study group were 11.1, 11.1, 3.7, and 7.4%, respectively. It should be considered that PCR yielded faint amplification band for A. otitidis.

CONCLUSION

Using multiplex PCR can help to increase detection rates of bacterial etiology. Healthy sinuses are not sterile. A. otitidis may be one of the pathogens causing sinusitis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Inonu University, Malatya, Turkey.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12862402

Citation

Kalcioglu, M Tayyar, et al. "Bacteriology of Chronic Maxillary Sinusitis and Normal Maxillary Sinuses: Using Culture and Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction." American Journal of Rhinology, vol. 17, no. 3, 2003, pp. 143-7.
Kalcioglu MT, Durmaz B, Aktas E, et al. Bacteriology of chronic maxillary sinusitis and normal maxillary sinuses: using culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Am J Rhinol. 2003;17(3):143-7.
Kalcioglu, M. T., Durmaz, B., Aktas, E., Ozturan, O., & Durmaz, R. (2003). Bacteriology of chronic maxillary sinusitis and normal maxillary sinuses: using culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction. American Journal of Rhinology, 17(3), 143-7.
Kalcioglu MT, et al. Bacteriology of Chronic Maxillary Sinusitis and Normal Maxillary Sinuses: Using Culture and Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction. Am J Rhinol. 2003 May-Jun;17(3):143-7. PubMed PMID: 12862402.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bacteriology of chronic maxillary sinusitis and normal maxillary sinuses: using culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction. AU - Kalcioglu,M Tayyar, AU - Durmaz,Bengul, AU - Aktas,Elif, AU - Ozturan,Orhan, AU - Durmaz,Riza, PY - 2003/7/17/pubmed PY - 2003/9/11/medline PY - 2003/7/17/entrez SP - 143 EP - 7 JF - American journal of rhinology JO - Am J Rhinol VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although many investigations have been performed on bacteriology of chronic sinusitis and normal sinuses, there still is much discussion. Also a new bacterial agent, Alloiococcus otitidis determined in the nasopharynx and middle ear specimens can be thought as a causative agent of sinusitis. METHODS: The bacteriology of chronic maxillary sinusitis and maxillary sinuses with normal radiogram and endoscopic findings were studied by culture methods for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to investigate four bacteria in study and control groups. There were 27 specimens in the study group and 28 specimens in the control group. RESULTS: In the study group, the bacteria commonly isolated were Staphylococcus aureus (11.1%), alpha-hemolytic streptococci (11.1%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (11.1%), Haemophilus influenzae (7.4%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (7.4%), and anaerobes (33.3%). Coagulase-negative staphylococci (14.3%), alpha-hemolytic streptococci (10.7%), and anaerobes (35.7%) were isolated also in the control group. PCR was used to investigate S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and A. otitidis in the study and control groups. None of these bacteria was determined in the control group whereas detection rates of these bacteria in the study group were 11.1, 11.1, 3.7, and 7.4%, respectively. It should be considered that PCR yielded faint amplification band for A. otitidis. CONCLUSION: Using multiplex PCR can help to increase detection rates of bacterial etiology. Healthy sinuses are not sterile. A. otitidis may be one of the pathogens causing sinusitis. SN - 1050-6586 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12862402/Bacteriology_of_chronic_maxillary_sinusitis_and_normal_maxillary_sinuses:_using_culture_and_multiplex_polymerase_chain_reaction_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -