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Management of menstrual migraine.
Neurologist. 2003 Jul; 9(4):207-13.N

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Migraine is more prevalent in women than men. Hormonal changes can influence the occurrence of migraine, particularly related to the menstrual cycle. Menstrual migraine may require both acute and preventive treatment.

REVIEW SUMMARY

Gender differences in migraine may be a result of variations in the central nervous system of men and women as well as the effects of estrogen. Migraine attacks occurring in the perimenstrual period respond well to acute treatment with triptans. Hormonal manipulation may reduce migraine occurrence, especially when related to hormonal fluctuations in the perimenstrual period.

CONCLUSIONS

Effective migraine management requires an understanding of the unique epidemiologic and pathophysiological factors affecting women. An understanding of associated hormonal influences facilitates development of individualized treatment plans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

LKMannixMD@aol.com

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

12864931

Citation

Mannix, Lisa K.. "Management of Menstrual Migraine." The Neurologist, vol. 9, no. 4, 2003, pp. 207-13.
Mannix LK. Management of menstrual migraine. Neurologist. 2003;9(4):207-13.
Mannix, L. K. (2003). Management of menstrual migraine. The Neurologist, 9(4), 207-13.
Mannix LK. Management of Menstrual Migraine. Neurologist. 2003;9(4):207-13. PubMed PMID: 12864931.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Management of menstrual migraine. A1 - Mannix,Lisa K, PY - 2003/7/17/pubmed PY - 2003/9/13/medline PY - 2003/7/17/entrez SP - 207 EP - 13 JF - The neurologist JO - Neurologist VL - 9 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Migraine is more prevalent in women than men. Hormonal changes can influence the occurrence of migraine, particularly related to the menstrual cycle. Menstrual migraine may require both acute and preventive treatment. REVIEW SUMMARY: Gender differences in migraine may be a result of variations in the central nervous system of men and women as well as the effects of estrogen. Migraine attacks occurring in the perimenstrual period respond well to acute treatment with triptans. Hormonal manipulation may reduce migraine occurrence, especially when related to hormonal fluctuations in the perimenstrual period. CONCLUSIONS: Effective migraine management requires an understanding of the unique epidemiologic and pathophysiological factors affecting women. An understanding of associated hormonal influences facilitates development of individualized treatment plans. SN - 1074-7931 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/12864931/Management_of_menstrual_migraine_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/01.nrl.0000080952.78533.0a DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -